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Africans in the Revolution

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Africans Americans in the Revolution

Damon Davis

Damon Davis
Mrs. Lafaele
11th Grade English
19 November 2012
African Americans in the Revolution
The American Revolution was not only the colonist’s fight to gain independence but also the African-Americans to gain freedom as well. There was a conflict in the whites wanting to gain liberation from England while also having black slaves and taking away their freedom at the same time. The contradiction to this is that the white’s concept of their freedom they were fighting for was different of those by the African Americans. To white Americans the war meant freedom and liberty in a being free from England’s political hold and taxes on the united states rather than what the blacks faced in personal, labor bondage the blacks suffered from.
The whites in fighting for their freedom gave the blacks a great chance to try to get their own personal freedom. They increased the number of chances a black would have in getting his freedom. They had to form a petition to let numerous amounts of blacks be freed at one time. The unfairness of this pushed blacks to fight for their freedom. African Americans saw this as an opportunity to use as leverage in their own quest in search of freedom.
However the blacks got most of their freedom by volunteering of taking up arms. They took up arms fighting for the British early in the Revolution. The British also offered blacks their freedom in return for their alliance in fighting the Americans. Blacks accepted but not because they were fighting for the British cause, but because they were fighting for their freedom. The Americans also opened up their military ranks to the blacks. However, they did not offer a chance for blacks to join the army until 1777, until the middle of the Revolution,…...

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