Anatomy I

In: Science

Submitted By Cookie216
Words 1421
Pages 6
Sarahbeth Cook
May 12, 2011
Anatomy I
Professor Kriota Willberg

It is rare to find someone with a complete and perfect symmetrical body. Every human being has his or her own skeletal structure and no one is alike. If you are one of those few people lucky enough to have “perfect symmetry and balance,” you might end up finding a flaw elsewhere, or so I’d like to think.
For myself, being as active of a dancer that I am, I already put a tremendous amount of wear and tare on my body, especially since I’ve been studying for eighteen years. The chances of me being perfectly in balance are slim to none. No matter how much physical therapy I do on my body, if I continue to dance with extreme physical motion I will always have something that is not in place. After doing these assessments I discovered a few things I didn’t realize about my body, but after analyzing them I see how they possibly may trigger some of my areas of discomfort. These imbalances affect my everyday activities, physical comfort, range of motion, and general sense of well-being.
I have the privilege of having a physical trainer to assist me at work before every performance. She’s there to make sure my imbalances are cared for and I’ve been given exercises to strengthen my weak areas. The main areas I’ve decided that need major work consist on my shoulders, spine, core, and ankle/foot. I’ve selected a series of exercises that I believe will help improve my weaknesses.
My overall posture is very good and that helps my head alignment as my chin is in place, balanced directly above my shoulders. Moving towards my shoulders it’s not completely obvious, but my right shoulder is slightly higher than my left. Resulting to my arm alignment, the left is longer than the right. Because my right shoulder is higher than my left, that affects the length of the arms. These imbalances could possibly be from…...

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