Art and Architecture

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Unit two Project Art and Architecture
Kaplan University
Ishmael Andrew Mills

Art and Humanities
HU: 300-01
Professor Ellie Schamber
Tuesday 12, 2012

My unit two project will explore both a piece of architecture and a work of art. I will first begin by locating a piece of architecture that catches my attention then provide a brief detailed explanation of what I see. I will then explain the element of form and function as it relates to the architectural work. Meanwhile I will locate a piece of art work that I find engaging and start by describing the work using terminology from the text. The following question will also be addressed. What is the medium? When was the work made? Is this work abstract or representational? What is the purpose of this art work? And what does it mean to me? For my selection of architecture I have chosen the Burj Al Arab Hotel. Retrieved from the following web link: http://www.dubai-architecture.info/DUB-003.htm
The Burj Al Arab hotel is located on Jumeriah Beach Road, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It was designed by Tom Wright of W.S Watkins. The hotel stands on an artificial island with a height of 919ft and is connected to the mainland by a private bridge.

Retrieved from the following web link: http://www.dubai-architecture.info/DUB-003.htm
While the hotel was being constructed, the workers had to drive 230 meter long concrete piles into the sand in order for it to have a good secured foundation. The found was protected from erosion by creating a surfaced layer of large rocks which formed a circled honey combed pattern around it.
The interior was designed by Khuan Chew, design principal of KCA International. The hotel consists of the tallest atrium which stands approximately 590ft.

Retrieved from the following web link: http://www.dubai-architecture.info/DUB-003.htm
If you take a close observation of the atrium you would…...

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