Bailout

In: Business and Management

Submitted By preziosa
Words 1918
Pages 8
Bailout Money Awarded to Major Bank Executives Their Impacts on Utilitarianism and Deontology
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TUI University

Abstract
This paper explores two published articles that report on banks receiving billions of taxpayers’ dollars awarded from the government known as the Trouble Asset Relief Program (TARP), who in turn paid their top executives billions of dollars for bonuses. TARP is a program to assist in the stability and strengthen its financial sector by paying for bad mortgages and other trouble assets. In order to prevent economic collapse, the Bush administration changed the programs goals. (Gold, 2008) Using the TARP funds to support and pay off executive’s bonuses poses a moral dilemma within society, which I will later discuss in the paper. The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, Should top executives of the major banks that received bail-out money be allowed to receive large bonuses? I will present my personal view on the matter using the bases of my values, beliefs and research that I have done on the topic. In addition, I will explain how bailout money awarded to major bank use for executives bonuses impacts on utilitarianism and deontology.

Bailout Money Awarded to Major Bank Executives and their Impacts on Utilitarianism and Deontology The United States began experiencing the recession during the early years of 2000. On September, 11, 2001 a tragedy in New York City occurred when the World Trade Center Towers were struck with airplanes, which contributed more to the recession the United States is facing. With the economy spiraling downward, millions of U.S. citizens are facing unemployment and job losses, which created a daisy chain effect, creating many home foreclosures, high increase of depth, homelessness, bad credit and more. To make matters worse, prices continue to soar for food, gas, rent and much more…...

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