Black Coalition for Aids Prevention

In: Business and Management

Submitted By abeenesh
Words 2118
Pages 9
Analysis of recruitment issues and their impacts on the strategic issues
The Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention (Black CAP) motto is "Because All Black People’s Lives Are Important", they aim at reducing the multiplication of HIV/AIDS infections within the Black communities in Toronto and improve the life of those affected by HIV/AIDS (Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention, 2014). Between 1999 and 2003 the number of Black people having AIDS increased by 80% (Remis 2006) and in 2003 about 12% of the population with HIV/AIDS in Toronto were black (Lawson et al. 2006). Black CAP seems to have a very dedicated workforce, however as Ryan noticed the present workforce was not enough and his workload was quite high. Ryan had about 75 volunteers at his disposal however studies have shown that more than 33% of the volunteers for a year will not be volunteering the next year as mentioned by Eisner et al. (2011, 2009). In 2013 the estimated worth of volunteer time was $22.55 per hour (National Value of Volunteer Time 2014), so instead of relying more and giving more responsibilities to paid workers Shannon could put more trust in his volunteers.
Before the arrival of Ryan at Black CAP, the organization was short on staff, so his first initiative was to recruit more staff which was a good as these people were delivering on the funders’ requirements. Response to the funders meant that they will continue to donate. However with the introduction of new staffs Ryan workload increased as each new recruit was to report directly to him. With 12 people reporting directly to him and the responsibility of the whole operation resting on his shoulders Ryan’s attention was divided and he could not give his best at any given tasks. In his situation which is to supervise and support his staff at the best possible level and his other tasks as the Executive Director. To further complicate the…...

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