Consider the Extent to Which Knowledge Issues in Ethics Are Similar to Those in at Least One Other Area of Knowledge

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By anamariad
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Knowledge is of great importance for humans to survive, since it provides us with some rules of how to deal with the world. Rules and norms, in turn, are the main subject matter of ethics. This is why all areas of knowledge can be connected with ethics. History, Mathematics, Human sciences and others support kind of ethics, but to what extent do all of these help people to understand morality and make the right decisions? Knowing sometimes can be an advantage or disadvantage depending on the circumstances. In the case of ethics it could help or hinder people knowing what to do. On the other hand, we all search for the real life reasons which will lead us the right way. Knowledge issues are sometimes controversial in Ethics, because quite often there is a conflict between two or more branches of, for example between social morality and the religious morality. Each person accepts and follows different kind of moral rules, under different cirsumstances. The controversies in the society what is right and what is wrong are huge. We either support some rules or do not. People often argue about their beliefs, no matter if they are religious or not. Such example could be given in history. To clarify, history is the study of the human past. It is a field of research which uses a narrative to examine and analyse the sequence of historical events, and it sometimes attempts to investigate objectively the patterns of cause and effect that determine past events. On the other hand, ethics is the branch of philosophy that addresses morality, that is, what is right and wrong, good and bad, honorable and dishonorable. A link between the two could be made as the example of terrorism is used.

“Terror” comes from the Latin terrere meaning “to frighten”. The term “terrorism” means the systematic use of terror especially as a means of intimidation. It was first used in ancient…...

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