Credit Crunch Us

In: Business and Management

Submitted By arslan54
Words 3115
Pages 13
Table of Content

Introduction..................................................................................

1.0 Impacts Of Credit Crunch On U.S........................................ 1.1 Impact on U.S Economy...................................................... 1.2 Impact on Interest Rates...................................................... 1.3 Impact on Banking Sector.................................................... 1.4 Impact on Mortgages and Credit Lending Agencies............ 1.5 Impact on GDP..................................................................... 1.6 Impact on Inflation................................................................ 1.7 Impact on Employment in U.S..............................................

2.0 Implemented Strategies To Overcome The Impacts............ 2.1 Fiscal Policy............................................................................ 2.2 Seek Direct Foreign Investment............................................. 2.3 Establish Proper Monitoring System...................................... 2.4 Strengthening the Country’s Internal Infrastructure...............

Conclusion......................................................................................

References......................................................................................

INTRODUCTION
“An immediate or sharp condition of unavailability of liquid money from the banks and money lending agencies in an economy is known as credit crunch”. The 2007-2009 global financial crises are known as Credit crunch which is described as economic recession and it is considered as worst financial crises after the last financial crises in 1930s. These financial crises resulted in the failure of many large financial agencies along with the liquidation of many banks…...

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