Criminal Theory

In: Other Topics

Submitted By jaunrivera1233
Words 340
Pages 2
The Labeling Theory implies individuals turn into criminals when important members of society label them as such and they recognize those labels as an individual’s identity. These labels entail a range of behaviors and attitudes. These labels therefore help identify not just one trait but the whole person. Once a label is given to a person they become part of all the stigmas that go with that label. For example, someone who has been convicted of a crime may be perceived as someone who has no respect for the law. Being recognized as a deviant, an individual is normally disliked by conservative social groups and for that reason is forced to become part of less enviable ones. Being part of less enviable social groups will only support that they are a deviant, and amplify the possibilities of involving in deviant behaviors. The primary deviance is the initial time an individual is labeled for deviant behavior. The secondary deviance is the deviant behavior that transpires after being labeled.
The Strain Theory implies crime is a function of the conflict between the goals people have and the means they can use to legally obtain them. While goals are the same for all the skills to achieve these goals is class dependant. As a result, lower classes feel anger, frustration and resentment which are referred to as strain. These individuals can either accept their circumstances and live out their days as socially responsible but un-satisfied citizens, or they can opt for other ways of achieving success, such as theft, violence or drug trafficking. For example if an adult experiences a great deal of strain when they were physically or sexually abused as a child. Furthermore, if the adult’s strain leads to anger, then the adult may possibly turn into a criminal as a way of coping. At this point the criminal must rehabilitate their minds and accept those limited justifiable…...

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