Dell Value Chain

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Value Chain
The value chain also chain as value chain analysis is a concept from business management that was first described and populated by Michael Porter in 1985. A value chain is a chain of activities for activities for a firm operating in a specific industry. The chain of activities gives the products more added values then the sum of added values of all activities and also said that, value chain is an interrelated series of process that produce a service on product to the satisfaction of customer. The concept of value chain also focuses attention on the types of processes in the value chain.
History of DELL: * Founded by Michael Dell in 1984 * The single concept: Selling computer systems directly to customers * Designed and built the first computer system of its own design in 1985 * Was one of the first computer companies to send a technician to homes to service personal computers in 1985 * Introduced the 316LT, the company’s first notebook computer in 1989 * Joined the top-five computer system makers worldwide in 1993 * Earning appr. $1 million per day 7 months after the launch of dell.com in 1996

* Introduced E-Support, an online tool to provide technical support to customers in 1999 * For the first time, Dell achieves No. 1 ranking in global market share in 2001
Activities of DELL:
Primary Activities:
Inbound logistics: 1. All those activities concerned with receiving and strong externally sourced materials. 2. Just in time ordering. 3. Close to suppliers.
Operations:
1. The manufacture of products and services- the way in which resources inputs are converted to outputs. 2. Build-to-order. 3. Customizations options.
Outbound logistics: 1. All those activities associated with getting finished goods and services buyers. 2. Close to customers. 3.…...

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