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RESEARCH
2015

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The Doctoral Programs at Harvard Business School educate scholars who make a difference in the world through rigorous academic research that influences practice.
More than 140 strong, HBS doctoral students represent diverse backgrounds, degrees, undergraduate schools, and disciplines­ includ— ing economics, engineering, mathematics, physics, psychology, and sociology. They examine the most critical issues in business management through rigorous research, creating and disseminating new knowledge as the next generation of thought leaders. By the time they graduate, students will have authored and co-authored publications with faculty members, who often become important mentors, colleagues, and collaborators.

ACCOUNTING AND MANAGEMENT
Chattopadhyay, Akash , Matthew R. Lyle, and
Charles C.Y. Wang. “Accounting Data, Market Values and the Cross-Section of Expected Returns Worldwide.” Working Paper, April 2015. (Revise and resubmit to Journal of Accounting and Economics.)
Gow, Ian D., Sa-Pyung Sean Shin, and Suraj Srinivasan. “Activist Directors: Determinants and Consequences.” HBS Working Paper 14-120, June 2014.
Gow, Ian D., Sa-Pyung Sean Shin, and Suraj Srinivasan. “Consequences to Directors of Shareholder Activism.” HBS Working Paper 14-071, February 2014.
Ioannou, Ioannis, Shelley Xin Li, and George Serafeim. “The Effect of Target Difficulty and Incentives on Target Completion: The Case of Reducing Carbon
Emissions.” HBS Working Paper 13-043, November
2012. (Revised August 2014.)
Khan, Mozaffar N., George Serafeim, and Aaron
Yoon . “Corporate Sustainability: First Evidence

H ARVA R D BU SI N ESS SCH OO L D O C T O R A L P R O G R A M S

on Materiality.” HBS Working Paper 15-073,
March 2015.

Li, Shelley Xin. “Boss, Cut Me Some Slack So That
I Can Innovate—Relaxing Time Constraints on Execution Tasks and Employee-initiated Innovation.”
Working Paper, March 2015.
ABSTRACT
Khan, Mozaffar N., George Serafeim, and Aaron Yoon. “Corporate Sustainability: First Evidence on Materiality.” HBS Working Paper 15-073,
March 2015.
An increasing number of companies make sustainability investments, and an increasing number of investors integrate sustainability performance data in their capital allocation decisions. To date, however, the prior academic literature has not distinguished between investments in material versus immaterial sustainability issues. We develop a novel dataset

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by hand-mapping data on sustainability investments classified as material for each industry into firm-specific performance data on a variety of sustainability investments. This allows us to present new evidence on the value implications of sustainability investments. Using calendar-time portfolio stock return regressions we find that firms with good performance on material sustainability issues significantly outperform firms with poor performance on these issues, suggesting that investments in sustainability issues are shareholder-value enhancing. Further, firms with good performance on sustainability issues not classified as material do not underperform firms with poor performance on these same issues, suggesting investments in sustainability issues are at a minimum not value destroying. Finally, firms with good performance on material issues and concurrently poor performance on immaterial issues perform the best.
These results speak to the efficiency of firms’ sustainability investments and also have implications for asset managers who have committed to the integration of sustainability factors in their capital allocation decisions.

BUSINESS ECONOMICS
Akhtari, Mitra, Diana Moreira, and Laura Trucco.
“Political Turnover, Bureaucratic Turnover and the
Quality of Public Services.” SSRN Working Paper
2538354, December 2014.
Alon, Noga, Slava Bronfman, Avinatan Hassidim, and Assaf Romm. “Redesigning the Israeli Medical
Internship Match.” Working Paper, February 2015.
Ashlagi, Itai, Afshin Nikzad, and Assaf Romm. “Assigning More Students to Their Top Choices: A Tiebreaking
Rule Comparison.” Working Paper, March 2015.
Bronfman, Slava, Avinatan Hassidim, Arnon Afek,
Assaf Romm, Rony Sherberk, Ayal Hassidim, and
Anda Massler. “Assigning Israeli Medical Graduates to Internships.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 4, no. 6 (March 2015).
Coles, Peter A., and Ran I. Shorrer. “Correlation in the Multiplayer Electronic Mail Game.” B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics 12, no. 1 (May 2012).
Coles, Peter A., and Ran I. Shorrer. “Optimal Truncation in Matching Markets.” Games and Economic
Behavior 87 (September 2014): 591–615.
Cornfeld, Ofer, and Oren Danieli. “The Origins of Income Inequality in Israel—Trends and Policy.” Israel
Economic Review (forthcoming).
De Gortari, Alonso, Yizhou Jin, and Shoshana Vassarman. “Competition on Information Acquisition in the Insurance Market.” Working Paper, April 2015.

Fedyk, Anastassia. “Overcoming Overconfidence:
Teamwork and Self-Control.” Working Paper,
November 2014.

H ARVA R D BU SI N ESS SCH OO L D O C T O R A L P R O G R A M S

Fedyk, Anastassia, and J. Hodson. “When Can the Market Identify Stale News?” Working Paper, April 2015.
Ferraz, Claudio, Frederico Finan, and Diana Moreira.
“Corrupting Learning: Evidence from Missing Federal Education Funds in Brazil.” Journal of Public Economics 96, nos. 9–10 (October 2012): 712–726.

Frick, Mira, and Assaf Romm. “Rational Behavior
Under Correlated Uncertainty.” Journal of Economic
Theory. (Revise and resubmit.)
Garbarino, Ellen, Robert Slonim, and Carmen Wang.
“The Multidimensional Effects of a Small Gift: Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment.” Economics
Letters 120, no. 1 (July 2013): 83–86.
Ghani, Ejaz, William R. Kerr, and Alexander Segura.
“Informal Tradables and the Employment Growth of
Indian Manufacturing.” World Bank Policy Research
Working Paper 7206, March 2015.

Jin, Yizhou. “Do Competitions in the Marriage Market
Deter Child Bearing in China? Evidence from Household Consumption.” Working Paper, April 2015.
Jin, Yizhou, and Michael Kincaid. “Effects of Housing Supply Elasticity on Local Labor Markets.” Working Paper, 2014.
Lockwood, Benjamin, Charles Nathanson, and E.
Glen Weyl. “Taxation and the Allocation of Talent.”
Journal of Political Economy. (Revise and resubmit.)
Lockwood, Benjamin, and Matthew Weinzierl. “De
Gustibus non est Taxandum: Heterogeneity in Preferences and Optimal Redistribution.” Journal of Public Economics (Accepted).
Lockwood, Benjamin, and Matthew Weinzierl. “Positive and Normative Judgments Implicit in U.S. Tax
Policy, and the Costs of Unequal Growth and Recessions.” Carnegie-Rochester–NYU Conference on
Public Policy (Accepted).
Powers, Thomas. “Expected Returns on Real Investments: Evidence from the Film Industry.” Working
Paper, August 2014.
Romm, Assaf. “Building Reputation at the Edge of the Cliff.” Working Paper, February 2013.
Romm, Assaf. “Implications of Capacity Reduction and Entry in Many-to-One Stable Matching.” Social
Choice and Welfare (December 2014).
Romm, Assaf, and Avinatan Hassidim. “An Approximate Law of One Price in Random Assignment Markets.” Working Paper, November 2014.
Roth, Alvin E., and Ran I. Shorrer. “The Redesign of the Medical Intern Assignment Mechanism in
Israel.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 4, no. 11 (March 2015).
Roth, Benjamin N., and Ran I. Shorrer. “Mechanism
Design in the Presence of a Pre-Existing Game.”
Working Paper, March 2015.

Shorrer, Ran I. “Solution to Exchanges 10.2
Puzzle: Borrowing in the Limit as Our Nerdiness
Goes to Infinity.” ACM SIGecom Exchanges 11, no. 1 (2012): 39–41.
Slonim, Robert, Carmen Wang, and Ellen Garbarino. “The Market for Blood.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 28, no. 2 (Spring 2014): 177–196.
Slonim, Robert, Carmen Wang, Ellen Garbarino, and
Danielle Merrett. “Opting-in: Participation Bias in
Economic Experiments.” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 90 (June 2013): 43–70.

Svirsky, Daniel. “The Cost of Strict Discovery: A Comparison of Manhattan and Brooklyn Criminal Cases.”
NYU Review of Law and Social Change 38 (2014).
Svirsky, Daniel. “Money Is No Object: Testing the
Endowment Effect in Exchange Goods.” Journal of
Economic Behavior & Organization 106 (October
2014): 227–234.
Sweeney, Richard, and Thomas Wollmann. “Two Period Approximations for Entry, Investment, and Positioning Games.” Mimeo, 2015.

Tabakovic, Haris, and Thomas Wollmann. “The Impact of Money on Science: Evidence from College
Football.” Mimeo, 2015.
Thaler, Michael. “Tribone Tilings of Triangular Regions Which Cover All but Three Holes.” Discrete and
Computational Geometry 53, no. 2 (March 2015):
466–477.
Wollmann, Thomas. “Signaling with Sales, Not for
Sales.” Mimeo, 2015.
Wollmann, Thomas . “Trucks Without Bailouts:
Equilibrium Product Characteristics for Commercial
Vehicles.” Mimeo, 2015.
ABSTRACT
Akhtari, Mitra, Diana Moreira, and
Laura Trucco. “Political Turnover, Bureaucratic Turnover and the Quality of
Public Services.” SSRN Working Paper 2538354, December 2014.
While it is expected that parties taking office will bring high-level officials to the government, less is known about what happens to lower-level employees.
In this paper, we study the effect of party turnover on the appointment of teachers and headmasters, as well as the quality of education provision in Brazil. Using a regression discontinuity design on close mayoral elections, we find that municipalities with a new party in office have higher turnover of headmasters and teachers the year after the election: 24- and
10-percentage points more positions are replaced, respectively. Party turnover also has real and persistent effects on education outcomes. In municipalities with turnover, test scores are 0.13 standard

deviations lower and dropout rates are 37% higher.
The decrease in performance persists three years after the election. The evidence suggests that the disruption of personnel at the school level is driving the decrease in students’ performance: headmasters are less experienced in their positions, and teachers’ assessment of the headmaster is more negative, whereas teachers’ characteristics, students’ characteristics, and resources spent on education do not seem to change. Taken together, our results suggest that the disruption to the bureaucracy has a real cost for the quality of service provision.

HEALTH POLICY MANAGEMENT
Ashraf, Nava, Oriana Bandiera, and Scott S. Lee.
“Awards Unbundled: Evidence from a Natural Field
Experiment.” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 100 (April 2014): 44–63.
Ashraf, Nava, Oriana Bandiera, and Scott S. Lee.
“Do-gooders and Ladder-climbers: Career Incentives, Selection, and Performance in Public Service
Delivery.” Working Paper, April 2015.
Huckman, Robert S., Hummy Song, and Jason R.
Barro. “Cohort Turnover and Productivity: The July
Phenomenon in Teaching Hospitals.” HBS Working
Paper 14-113, May 2014.

Jung, Olivia, Wei Jiang, Lizabeth Edmondson, Ashley-Kay Childers, Dante Conley, Lyen Huang, Mathew
Kiang, Alex Haynes, William Berry, and Sara J. Singer. “Principles Associated with Successful Implementation of Delivery System Innovations: Lessons from
Safe Surgery 2015.” HSPH Working Paper, 2015.
Lee, Scott S. “Intrinsic Incentives: A Field Experiment on Leveraging Intrinsic Motivation in Public
Service Delivery.” Working Paper, April 2015.
Song, Hummy, Alyna T. Chien, Josephine Fisher, Julia Martin, Antoinette S. Peters, Karen Hacker, Meredith B. Rosenthal, and Sara J. Singer. “Development and Validation of the Primary Care Team Dynamics
Survey.” Health Services Research (forthcoming).
Song, Hummy, Molly Ryan, Shalini Tendulkar, Josephine Fisher, Julia Martin, Antoinette S. Peters,
Joseph P. Frolkis, Meredith B. Rosenthal, Alyna T.
Chien, and Sara J. Singer. “Team Dynamics, Clinical Work Satisfaction, and Patient Care Coordination
Between Primary Care Providers.” (Under review.)
Song, Hummy, Anita L. Tucker, and Karen L. Murrell. “The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay.” Management Science (forthcoming).
Song, Hummy, Anita L. Tucker, Karen L. Murrell, and David R. Vinson. “Working Harder or Working Smarter: The Effects of Public Relative Performance Feedback on Worker Productivity.” Working
Paper, April 2015.
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Tucker, Anita L., and Hummy Song. “Performance
Improvement in Health Care Organizations.” Foundations and Trends in Technology, Information and
Operations Management. (Revise and resubmit.)
ABSTRACT
Huckman, Robert S., Hummy Song, and Jason R. Barro. “Cohort Turnover and Productivity: The July Phenomenon in Teaching Hospitals.” HBS
Working Paper 14-113, May 2014.
We consider the impact of cohort turnover—the planned simultaneous exit of a large number of experienced employees and a similarly sized entry of new workers—on productivity in the context of teaching hospitals. Specifically, we examine the impact of the annual July resident turnover in U.S. teaching hospitals on levels of resource utilization and quality in teaching hospitals relative to a control group of non-teaching hospitals. Despite the anticipated nature of the cohort turnover and the supervisory structures that exist in teaching hospitals, this annual cohort turnover results in increased resource utilization
(i.e., longer length of hospital stay) for both minor and major teaching hospitals and decreased quality
(i.e., higher mortality rates) for major teaching hospitals. In major teaching hospitals, particularly, we find evidence of a gradual trend of decreasing performance that begins several months before the actual cohort turnover. This anticipation effect may result from a transition of responsibilities at major teaching hospitals in advance of the cohort turnover. Finally, we find some evidence that higher levels of resident oversight may dampen the negative impact of resident turnover on hospital productivity.

MANAGEMENT

ABSTRACT

Altman, Elizabeth J., Frank Nagle, and Michael
L. Tushman. “Innovating Without Information Constraints: Organization, Communities, and Innovation
When Information Costs Approach Zero.” In Oxford
Handbook of Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Multilevel Linkages, edited by Christina
Shalley, Michael Hitt, and Jing Zhou. Oxford, UK:
Oxford University Press, 2015.

Cromwell, Johnathan R., and Heidi
K. Gardner. “Legal Innovation
Through Collaborative Recombination: Overcoming the Limits of Diverse Experts and Failure of New
Partners.” (Under review.)

Altman, Elizabeth J., Frank Nagle, and Michael
L. Tushman. “Technology and Innovation Management.” In Oxford Bibliographies: Management, edited by Ricky W. Griffin. New York: Oxford University
Press, 2013.
Altman, Elizabeth J., and Mary Tripsas. “Product to
Platform Transitions: Implications of Organizational Identity.” In Oxford Handbook of Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Multilevel Linkages, edited by Christina Shalley, Michael Hitt, and Jing
Zhou. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2015.
Brown, Daniel, and Rakesh Khurana. “Leading Socially Responsible, Value-Creating Corporations.” In
Corporate Stewardship: Organizing for Sustainable
Effectiveness, edited by Edward Lawler, Sue Mohrman, and Jim O’Toole. Greenleaf Publishing, 2015.
Cromwell, Johnathan R., and Heidi K. Gardner. “Legal Innovation Through Collaborative Recombination: Overcoming the Limits of Diverse Experts and
Failure of New Partners.” (Under review.)
Green, Paul, Jr., Francesca Gino, and Bradley R.
Staats. “Finding Meaning in Seemingly Meaningless
Work: How the Words of Internal and External Beneficiaries Influence Performance.” Working Paper, April
2015. (In preparation for submission to Administrative Science Quarterly.)
Pendem, Pradeep, Bradley R. Staats, Paul Green,
Jr., and Francesca Gino. “Operational Failures and
Productivity: Breaks, Disruptions and Workload in
Agribusiness.” Working Paper, April 2015. (In preparation for submission to Management Science.)

Satterstrom, Patricia. “A Process Model Using Teams to Renegotiate Power.” Working Paper, March 2015.
Satterstrom, Patricia, Jeffrey Polzer, and Robert
Wei. “Reframing Hierarchical Interactions as Negotiations to Promote Change in Health Care Systems.”
In Handbook of Conflict Management Research, edited by Oluremi B. Ayoko, Neal M. Ashkanasy, and Karen A. Jehn, 291–307. Northampton, MA:
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014.
Tadmor, Carmit, Patricia Satterstrom, Sujin Jang, and Jeffrey Polzer. “Beyond Individual Creativity:
The Superadditive Benefits of Multicultural Experience for Collective Creativity in Culturally Diverse
Teams.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 43, no. 3 (April 2012): 384–392.
H ARVA R D BU SI N ESS SCH OO L D O C T O R A L P R O G R A M S

Collaborative recombination is becoming increasingly important in the production of innovation and new knowledge, but theory on the dynamics of collaborative recombination in teams is still relatively sparse. We conducted content analysis on interview data from 148 teams competing in a legal innovation contest to explore why some teams were more innovative than others under varying levels of complexity and performance pressure. We found that teams of diverse experts overcame their limits on complex problems not by increasing collaboration with more experts, but by increasing collaboration with generalists. For extremely complex problems, teams of experts and generalists engaged in a process we call bounded exploration, which was an enhanced recombination process that enabled teams to produce highly innovative solutions to highly complex problems. Additionally, we found that performance pressure was a significant moderator on the effects between new partners and innovation. Under baseline conditions, collaboration with a new partner had a positive effect on innovation and produced more innovative solutions than collaboration with a highly familiar partner. But in high-pressure conditions, both of these effects reversed: collaboration with a new partner had a negative effect on innovation and produced less innovative solutions than collaboration with a highly familiar partner.

MARKETING
Barasz, Kate, Leslie K. John, and Michael I. Norton.
“Pseudo-Set Framing.” (Manuscript under review.)
Barasz, Kate, Tami Kim, and Leslie K. John. “Mistaking Dissimilar for Dislike: Why We Mispredict Others’ Diverse Preferences.” (Manuscript in preparation.)
Baucells, Manel, and Silvia Bellezza. “Temporal Profiles of Instant Utility During Anticipation, Event, and
Recall.” (Under review at Management Science.)

Bellezza, Silvia, and Joshua M. Ackerman. “‘Be
Careless with That!’ Availability of Product Upgrades
Increases Cavalier Behavior Toward Possessions.”
(Under review at Journal of Marketing Research.)

MIT Sloan Management Review 55, no. 3 (Spring
2014): 10–11.

Bellezza, Silvia, and Anat Keinan. “Brand Tourists:
How Non-Core Users Enhance the Brand Image by
Eliciting Pride.” Journal of Consumer Research 41, no. 2 (August 2014): 397–417.
Bellezza, Silvia, and Anat Keinan. “How ‘Brand
Tourists’ Can Grow Sales.” Harvard Business Review
92, nos. 7/8 (July–August 2014): 26.
Bellezza, Silvia, Anat Keinan, and Neeru Paharia.
“Conspicuous Consumption of Time: When Busyness and Lack of Leisure Time Become a Status Symbol.”
(Under review at Journal of Consumer Research.)
Buell, Ryan W., Tami Kim, and Chia-Jung Tsay.
“Creating Reciprocal Value Through Operational Transparency.” HBS Working Paper 14-115,
September 2014.
Chung, Doug J., and Lingling Zhang. “The Air War versus The Ground Game: An Analysis of Multi-Channel Marketing in U.S. Presidential Elections.” HBS
Working Paper 15-033, October 2014.
John, Leslie K., Kate Barasz, and Michael I. Norton.
“What Hiding Reveals.” (Manuscript under review.)

Kireyev, Pavel, Vineet Kumar, and Elie Ofek. “Match
Your Own Price? Self-Matching as a Retailer’s Multichannel Pricing Strategy.” HBS Working Paper 15058, January 2015.
Mohan, Bhavya, Ryan W. Buell, and Leslie K. John.
“Lifting the Veil: The Benefits of Cost Transparency.”
HBS Working Paper 15-017, September 2014. (Revised December 2014.)
Mohan, Bhavya, Pierre Chandon, and Jason Riis.
“Percentage Cost Discounts Always Beat Percentage Benefit Bonuses: Helping Consumers Evaluate
Nominally Equivalent Percentage Changes.” Journal of Marketing Behavior (forthcoming).
Zhang, Lingling, and Anita Elberse. “Blurred Lines:
Do Live-Music Sales Drive Recorded-Music Sales?”
Working Paper, April 2015.
Zhang, Ting, Tami Kim, Alison Wood Brooks, Francesca Gino, and Michael I. Norton. “A ‘Present’ for the Future: The Unexpected Value of Rediscovery.”
Psychological Science 25, no. 10 (October 2014):
1851–1860.
Zhang, Lingling, Clarence Lee, and Anita Elberse.
“Viral Videos: The Dynamics of Online Video Advertising Campaigns.” Working Paper, April 2015.

Bellezza, Silvia, Francesca Gino, and Anat Keinan.
“The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Non-conformity.” Journal of
Consumer Research 41, no. 1 (June 2014): 35–54.
Bellezza, Silvia, Francesca Gino, and Anat Keinan. “The Surprising Benefits of Nonconformity.”

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ABSTRACT

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

Zhang, Ting, Tami Kim, Alison Wood
Brooks, Francesca Gino, and Michael
I. Norton. “A ‘Present’ for the Future:
The Unexpected Value of Rediscovery.” Psychological Science 25, no.
10 (October 2014): 1851–1860.

Arnett, Rachel D. “Approaching and Avoiding: How
Parental Role Models Influence Professional and
Family Identity Construction.” Working Paper.

Although documenting everyday activities may seem trivial, four studies reveal that creating records of the present generates unexpected benefits by allowing future rediscoveries. In Study 1, we used a time-capsule paradigm to show that individuals underestimate the extent to which rediscovering experiences from the past will be curiosity provoking and interesting in the future. In Studies 2 and 3, we found that people are particularly likely to underestimate the pleasure of rediscovering ordinary, mundane experiences, as opposed to extraordinary experiences.
Finally, Study 4 demonstrates that underestimating the pleasure of rediscovery leads to time-inconsistent choices: individuals forgo opportunities to document the present but then prefer rediscovering those moments in the future to engaging in an alternative fun activity. Underestimating the value of rediscovery is linked to people’s erroneous faith in their memory of everyday events. By documenting the present, people provide themselves with the opportunity to rediscover mundane moments that may otherwise have been forgotten.
ABSTRACT

Bellezza, Silvia, Anat Keinan, and
Neeru Paharia. “Conspicuous Consumption of Time: When Busyness and Lack of Leisure Time Become a
Status Symbol.” In Advances in Consumer Research. Vol. 42, edited by June Cotte and
Stacy Wood, 17–21. Duluth, MN: Association for
Consumer Research. (Also under review at Journal of
Consumer Research.)
In this research we uncover an alternative kind of conspicuous consumption that operates by shifting the focus from the preciousness and scarcity of goods to the preciousness and scarcity of individuals. In contrast to the theory of the leisure class (Veblen 1899/2007), we propose that busyness at work and lack of leisure time can signal high status in the eyes of others. A series of studies shows that the positive inferences of status in response to busyness
(and products associated with busyness) are driven by the perception that a busy person is in demand and scarce. Furthermore, we examine cultural values
(the protestant work ethic) and differences among cultures (North America vs. Europe) to demonstrate moderators and boundary conditions. Finally, we show that the aspiration to be like a busy individual is higher for status-conscious people, despite the fact that a busy individual is viewed to be less happy.
H ARVA R D BU SI N ESS SCH OO L D O C T O R A L P R O G R A M S

Arnett, Rachel D. “Liberal vs. Traditional: How Gender Equality in the Workplace Is Thwarted by Traditional Gender Norms in the Home.” Working Paper.
Arnett, Rachel D., Francesca Gino, and Bradley R.
Staats. “Boosting Worker Performance Through Longterm Self-confidence in Impoverished Communities.”
Working Paper.
Arnett, Rachel D., Beth H. Humberd, Judy Clair, and
Kathleen L. McGinn. “The Construction of Self, Profession & Gender Through Professional Transitions.”
Working Paper.
Arnett, Rachel D., and Jim Sidanius. “Me vs. Us:
Concealing High Status Identities from Lower Status
Peers.” Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings (2015). (Under review at Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.)
Chan, Curtis K., and Michel Anteby. “Task Segregation as a Mechanism for Work Inequality: Women and Men of the Transportation Security Administration.” (2015). (Provisionally accepted at Administrative Science Quarterly.)
Cuddy, Amy, Caroline Wilmuth, Andy J. Yap, and
Dana R. Carney. “Preparatory Power Posing Affects Nonverbal Presence and Job Interview Performance.” Journal of Applied Psychology (in press).

Kim, Tami, Ovul Sezer, Juliana Schroeder, Jane
Risen, Francesca Gino, and Michael I. Norton.
“Group Rituals Improve Group Performance.”
Working Paper.
Kteily, Nour, Rachel D. Arnett, Carlos D. Navarrete, and Jim Sidanius. “The Theory of Gendered Prejudice: Gendered Difference in the Acquisition and Extinction of Fear Towards Outgroup Males vs. Females in a Minimal Group Context.” Working Paper.

Manning, Ryann. “FollowMe.IntDev.Com: International Development in the Blogosphere.” In Popular Representations of Development: Insights from
Novels, Films, Television, and Social Media, edited by David Lewis, Dennis Rodgers, and Michael Woolcock. Routledge, 2013.
Manning, Ryann. “A Place for Emotion: How Space
Structures Nurse-Parent Interactions in West African Pediatric Wards.” Best Paper Proceedings of the 2014 Academy of Management Meeting. (Nominated for OMT Division Best Student Paper.) (Revise and resubmit to American Sociological Review.)
Manning, Ryann, and Michel Anteby. “Babies,
Bones, and Brides: Wrong Paths to Right in the
Context of Moral Orders vs. Moral Pursuits.” In Organizational Wrongdoing, edited by Donald Palmer,
Royston Greenwood, and Kristin Smith-Crowe. Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

Fernandes, Catarina R., and Jeffrey T. Polzer. “Diversity in Groups.” In Emerging Trends in the Social and
Behavioral Sciences, edited by Robert Scott and Stephen Kosslyn. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2015.

Manning, Ryann, Julie Battilana, and Lakshmi Ramarajan. “Communicating Change: When Identity
Becomes a Source of Vulnerability for Institutional
Challengers.” Best Paper Proceedings of the 2014
Academy of Management Meeting. (Nominated for
Best OMT Empirical Paper on Environmental and
Social Practice.)

Gardner, Heidi K., and Lisa Kwan. “Expertise Dissensus: A Multi-level Model of Teams’ Differing Perceptions About Member Expertise.” HBS Working
Paper 12-070, March 2012.

Perlow, Leslie, Melissa Mazmanian, and Elizabeth
Hansen. “Shifting Towards a Collective Temporal Orientation: Enabling a Sustainable Performance Culture.”
(Under review at Administrative Science Quarterly.)

Gibson, Jane Whitney, Wei Chen, Erin L. Henry,
John Humphreys, and Yunshan Lian. “Examining the
Work of Mary Parker Follett Through the Lens of Critical Biography.” Journal of Management History 19, no. 4 (2013): 441–458. (Highly Commended Paper of 2013 Winner.)

Polzer, Jeffrey T., and Lisa Kwan. “When Identities, Interests, and Information Collide: How Subgroups Create
Hidden Profiles in Teams.” In Looking Back, Moving Forward: A Review of Group and Team-Based Research. Vol. 15, edited by Margaret Neale and Elizabeth
Mannix, 359–381. Research on Managing Groups and
Teams. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing, 2012.

Gibson, Jane Whitney, Russell Clayton, Jack Deem,
Jacqueline Einstein, and Erin L. Henry. “Viewing the Work of Lillian M. Gilbreth Through the Lens of Critical Biography.” Journal of Management
History (forthcoming).

Sezer, Ovul, Francesca Gino, and Max H. Bazerman. “Ethical Blind Spots: Explaining Unintentional Unethical Behavior.” Current Opinion in
Psychology (forthcoming).

Hansen, Elizabeth. “Muddling Through: Identity, Culture, and Decision-Making in Managers’ Response to Uncertainty.” Working Paper, 2015.

Sezer, Ovul , Francesca Gino, and Michael I.
Norton. “The Psychology of Humblebragging.”
Working Paper.

Henry, Erin L. “Not Just Keeping the Lights On:
Stakeholder Engagement for Mutual Gain at a Utility.”
Working Paper, 2014.

Sezer, Ovul, Ting Zhang, Francesca Gino, and Max H.
Bazerman. “Overcoming the Outcome Bias: Making
Intentions Matter.” Working Paper.

Wilmuth, Caroline, Alison Wood Brooks, and Francesca Gino. “Lean in To Be Stretched Thin? Compared to Men, Women Have More Life Goals and Associate High-Power Positions with More Negative
Outcomes.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Under review.)
Zhang, Ting. “Back to the Beginning: Rediscovering Inexperience Helps Experts Give Advice.”
Working Paper.
Zhang, Ting, Francesca Gino, and Max H. Bazerman.
“Morality Rebooted: Exploring Simple Fixes to Our
Moral Bugs.” Research in Organizational Behavior 34
(2014): 63–79.
Zhang, Ting, Francesca Gino, and Joshua D. Margolis. “Does ‘Could’ Lead to Good? Toward a Theory of Moral Insight.” Academy of Management Journal.
(Revise and resubmit.)
Zhang, Ting, Francesca Gino, and Michael I. Norton. “The Surprising Effectiveness of Hostile Mediators.” Management Science. (Revise and resubmit.)
Zhang, Ting, Tami Kim, Alison Wood Brooks, Francesca Gino, and Michael I. Norton. “A ‘Present’ for the Future: The Unexpected Value of Rediscovery.”
Psychological Science 25, no. 10 (October 2014):
1851–1860.
ABSTRACT

Chan, Curtis K., and Michel Anteby.
“Task Segregation as a Mechanism for Work Inequality: Women and Men of the Transportation Security Administration.” (2015). (Provisionally accepted at Administrative Science Quarterly.)
What could explain inequality within a given job between groups of workers, particularly between women and men? In answering this question, past scholarship has largely overlooked a job’s work content, typically treating a job as a homogeneous bundle of similarly allocated tasks. Yet, it is possible for considerable within-job task heterogeneity to be differentially allocated by worker group. We label this possibility “task segregation”—when a group of workers is disproportionately allocated to spend more time doing particular tasks within a job. If these tasks are relatively undesirable, then the segregated group may have relatively poorer job quality. Drawing on interviews with security screeners at the Transportation Security Administration, we analyze a case of task segregation and the processes through which it generated inequality. Relative to male screeners, female screeners were more often allocated the reportedly undesirable task of passenger pat-downs, thus disproportionately exposing them to intertwined processes of physical exertion, emotional labor, and relational strain. Task segregation also disproportionately exposed female screeners to processes of

R E S E A R C H , 2 015

managerial sanction and skillset narrowing that further contributed to poor job quality for women. Overall, our study shows how task segregation can act as a mechanism for generating within-job inequality in job quality.
ABSTRACT

Arnett, Rachel D., and Jim Sidanius.
“Me vs. Us: Concealing High Status
Identities from Lower Status Peers.”
Academy of Management Best Paper
Proceedings (2015). (Under review at Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.)
Scholars commonly portray status in terms of its manifold benefits and positive consequences. Given this, people may reveal high status identities whenever given the opportunity. However, the present studies provide evidence that people will conceal a high status identity when the identity elevates the self above one’s peers. Across five experiments, we manipulated the status of a peer to be either similar to or lower than participants’ status and then examined disclosure of a high status identity. Studies 1 and 2 establish that individuals are less likely to disclose a high status identity when interacting with a lower status peer, compared to a similarly high status peer. Study
3 demonstrates that lower disclosure reflects a desire to minimize interpersonal threats to the self, others, and belonging. Study 4 shows that even when participants are not held accountable for disclosing a high status identity to a peer, they are still unwilling to disclose. Study 5 reveals that elevating the perceived importance and benefits of status does not eliminate the effect of peer status on disclosure; participants are still hesitant to disclose a high status identity in the presence of a lower status peer even when it would be personally beneficial to do so.

STRATEGY

TECHNOLOGY & OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

Eisenhardt, Kathleen, Rory McDonald, and Cheng
Gao. “Competition as Strategic Interaction.” HBS
Working Paper 15-067, February 2015.

Altman, Elizabeth J., Frank Nagle, and Michael L.
Tushman. “Innovating Without Information Constraints: Organization, Communities, and Innovation when Information Costs Approach Zero.” In
Oxford Handbook of Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Multilevel Linkages, edited by Christina Shalley, Michael Hitt, and Jing Zhou. New York:
Oxford University Press, 2015.

Gao, Cheng, Tiona Zuzul, Geoffrey Jones, and Tarun
Khanna. “Reputation and Long Run Advantage in
Emerging Markets.” Working Paper, October 2014.
Hugill, Andrea, and Constance Helfat. “Managerial
Capabilities.” In The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Strategic Management, edited by Mie Augier and David J. Teece. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2013.
Hugill, Andrea, and Constance Helfat. “Managerial Rents.” In The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Strategic Management, edited by Mie Augier and David J.
Teece. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2013.
Hugill, Andrea, and Josh Lerner. “The Future of
Long-Term Investing.” World Economic Forum Report (2011). (In collaboration with Oliver Wyman
Consulting.)
Hugill, Andrea, and Jordan Siegel. “Which Does
More to Determine the Quality of Corporate Governance in Emerging Economies, Firms or Countries?”
HBS Working Paper 13–055, December 2012. (Revised March 2013 and June 2014.)
Short, Jodi L., Michael W. Toffel, and Andrea Hugill.
“Monitoring Global Supply Chains.” HBS Working
Paper 14-032, October 2013.

Tabakovic, Haris, and Thomas Wollmann. “The Impact of Money on Science: Evidence from College
Football.” Mimeo, 2015.
ABSTRACT

Hugill, Andrea, and Jordan Siegel.
“Which Does More to Determine the
Quality of Corporate Governance in
Emerging Economies, Firms or
Countries?” HBS Working Paper 13–
055, December 2012. (Revised March 2013 and
June 2014.)
Scholars of corporate governance have debated the relative importance of country and firm characteristics in understanding corporate governance variation across emerging economies. Using panel data and a number of model specifications, we shed new light on this debate. We find that firm characteristics are as important as, and often meaningfully more important than, country characteristics. In fact, 16.8% of firms in emerging economies have been able to exceed the 75th percentile of ratings in developed economies. Our results suggest that over recent years, firms in emerging economies had more capability to rise above weak home-country institutions than previously suggested.

H ARVA R D BU SI N ESS SCH OO L D O C T O R A L P R O G R A M S

Altman, Elizabeth J., Frank Nagle, and Michael
L. Tushman. “Technology and Innovation Management.” In Oxford Bibliographies: Management, edited by Ricky W. Griffin. New York: Oxford University
Press, 2013.

Balasubramanian, Karthik, and David F. Drake.
“Mobile Money: The Effect of Service Quality and
Competition on Demand.” HBS Working Paper, January 2015.
Doshi, Anil R. “The Impact of High Performance
Outliers on Two-Sided Platforms: Evidence from
Crowdfunding.” Working Paper, 2015.
Doshi, Anil R. “Organizational Management of Social Media.” Working Paper, 2015.
Doshi, Anil R., Glen W. Dowell, and Michael W. Toffel.
“How Firms Respond to Mandatory Information
Disclosure.” Strategic Management Journal 34, no. 10 (October 2013): 1209–1231.
Doshi, Anil R., and Shiladitya Ray. “Social Media,
Loyalty, and Organizational Performance.” Working
Paper, 2015.
Greenstein, Shane, and Frank Nagle. “Digital Dark
Matter and the Economic Contribution of Apache.”
Research Policy 43, no. 4 (May 2014): 623–631.

ABSTRACT

Nagle, Frank. “Crowdsourced Digital
Goods and Firm Productivity: Evidence from Open Source Software.” HBS
Working Paper 15-062, January 2015.
As crowdsourced digital goods become more widely available and more frequently used as key inputs by firms, understanding the impact they have on productivity becomes of critical importance. This study measures the firm-level productivity impact of one such good, non-pecuniary (free) open source software (OSS). The results show a positive and significant return to the usage of non-pecuniary OSS that has gone unmeasured in prior studies of the economics of IT and is not solely due to cost savings. The study addresses the endogeneity issues inherent in productivity studies by using inverse probability weighting, an instrumental variable approach, firm-fixed effects, and data on management quality from the World Management Survey to add support for a causal interpretation. Across firms, a 1% increase in the amount of non-pecuniary
OSS used by a firm leads to a .073% increase in productivity. This translates to a $1.35 million increase in value-added production for the average firm in the sample. This is more than double the magnitude of the coefficient on investments in traditional pecuniary IT capital. This effect is greater for larger firms and for firms in the services industry. These findings suggest that firms willing to take on the risks associated with non-pecuniary OSS reap benefits from collective intelligence and labor spillovers. Further, the results indicate that existing studies underestimate the amount of IT used at the firm.

McElheran, Kristina, Frank Nagle, and Steven Kahl.
“Supply-Chain Based Network Effects in Information Technology Adoption.” Working Paper, 2015.

Nagle, Frank. “Crowdsourced Digital Goods and
Firm Productivity: Evidence from Open Source Software.” HBS Working Paper 15-062, January 2015.
Nagle, Frank . “Enhancing Absorptive Capacity via Contributing to Crowdsourced Digital Goods.”
Working Paper, 2015.
Nagle, Frank. “Stock Market Prediction via Social
Media: The Importance of Competitors.” Working
Paper, 2014.
Nagle, Frank, and Christopher Riedl. “Online Word of Mouth and Product Quality Disagreement.” HBS
Working Paper 13-091, May 2013. (Revised January
2014.) Best Paper Proceedings of the 2014 Academy of Management Meeting. (Under review.)

R E S E A R C H , 2 015

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL
DOCTORAL PROGRAMS
WYSS HOUSE
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02163
WWW.HBS.EDU / DOCTORAL

H ARVA R D BU SI N ESS SCH OO L D O C T O R A L P R O G R A M S…...

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