Determinants of Population Increase

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DETERMINANTS OF POPULATION INCREASE AMONG THREE PROGRAMS OF DAVAO DOCTORS COLLEGE
TITLE

Introduction
Before we leave and say goodbye to high school all of us wondered “what course should I take up?” many has to stop and find a job for them to enroll at college, lucky are those who can afford to go and enroll to college. But why do we need to study and take college? College is a preparation for us to get ready for the profession we always wanted to, it is also a preparation for us to face what may future brings us and to face the things in our own way responsibly.

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

THE OVER ALL PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO KNOW THE DETERMINANTS OF POPULATION INCREASE AMONG THREE PROGRAMS OF DAVAO DOCTORS COLLEGE

OBJECTIVES

*WHAT IS THE DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE PARTICIPANTS IN TERMS OF:

AGE:
SEX:

WHAT ARE THE FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE INCREASE IN POPULATION OF THE THREE PROGRAMS OF DAVAO DOCTORS COLLEGE?

HYPOTHESIS

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY
THE FINDINGS OF THE STUDY MAY PROVIDE INFORMATIONS ON THE DETERMINANTS OF POPULATION INCREASE AMONG THREE PROGRAMS OF DAVAO DOCTORS COLLEGE

*TO THE STUDENTS. THE RESULT OF THIS STUDY MAY SERVE AS AN INSPIRATION FOR THEM TO PURSUE THEIR STUDIES AS A RadTech, OPTOMETRY AND PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS AND FOR THE INCOMING COLLEGE STUDENTS TO ENROLL AMONG THE THREE PROGRAMS OFFERED BY DAVAO DOCTORS COLLEGE AS THEY REALIZE THAT THERE IS SO MUCH GOOD OPORTUNITIES WAITING FOR THEM AS THEY TAKE THE FIRST STEP UPON ENTERING ANY OF THE PROGRAMS BY DAVAO DOCTORS COLLEGE.

*TO THE TEACHERS. THE RESULT OF THE STUDY MAY SERVE AS AN INSPIRATION OR MOTIVATION TO THE TEACHERS TO CONTINUE TO TEACH AND SHARE THEIR KNOWLEDGE TO THE STUDENTS.

*TO THE ADMINISTRATORS. THE RESULT OF THIS STUDY MAY SERVE AS AN INSPIRATION OR MOTIVATION FOR THEM TO ADMINISTRATE THE FACULTIES OF…...

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