Developing Worlds

In: Social Issues

Submitted By vfrench1
Words 1193
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Politics of the Developing World
POL 469
November 13, 2012
Paul De La Pena

Politics of the Developing World
Development of the world is unpredictable and uncontrollable at times. With so many countries shaping the world and contributing to its issues and ever changing issues it is hard to say what the future will bring. Dynamics that will form the future of the world and to take into consideration are economic disparities among countries in the North and South, social and political changes in the developing world, environmental changes, and population patterns. These entire factors will influence and affect the future of the world.
Economic disparity
Economic disparity amongst countries varies greatly. The South compared to the North displays how there can be a large difference between countries in the South and North. A large factor contributing to the economic disparity of the South has to do with the lack of a properly developed government and human rights violations. Mexico for example is known for its high poverty levels and below minimum wage pay rates. Many United States companies have moved their production and assembly plants to Mexico in order to save on the cost of labor. These Mexicans/Hispanics many work in these factories and make about sixty to seventy dollars per week. Neither the Mexican president nor the government has done anything to pass laws to offer employees a minimum wage pay rate. Along with a below minimum wage pay rate many of the citizens of Mexico have several children and many are single mothers living in below living standards.
Economic disparity can be minimized by countries becoming industrialized and specializing and being competitive within trading markets. Many of the countries in the South lack the advancement of technology and education. With the appropriate technology and education a country face economic disparity…...

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