Discrete Math

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Most people think that computer programming just recently had been created but far from that, it started for over a century. Starting from Charles Babbage’s steam driven machine named the Analytical Engine back in 1834. This idea caught the attention of a mathematician Ada Lovelace, she wrote a program to make the Analytical Engine calculate and print a sequence of numbers known as Bernoulli numbers. Because of her work with the Analytical Engine, she is considered as the first ever computer programmer. The first true computer appeared in 1943 when the U.S. Army created a computer called ENIAC that was able to calculate artillery trajectories. To give it instructions, you had to physically flip its different switches and rearrange its cables. However, physically rearranging cables and switches to reprogram a computer proved to be very tasking and clumsy. So instead of physically rearranging the computer’s wiring, computer scientists decided it would be easier to give the computer different instructions. In the old days, computers were taking up entire rooms and cost millions of dollars. Today, computers have shrunk that they are essentially nothing more than a piece of granular bar which are called the central processing unit (CPU), or processor. However in order to tell the processor what to do, you have to give it instructions written in a language that it can understand. That is where programming languages comes in. There many different computer languages and each one of them are similar in some ways, but are also different in other ways, such as: program syntax, the format of the language, and the limitations of the language. Most computer programmers start programming in languages such as: Turbo Pascal, Basic, Assembly, and FORTRAN are some of the oldest computer languages and C, C++, Visual basic are some of today’s popular and advance languages. Many of…...

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