Discuss Marx's Theory of Alienation and Assess Whether It Is Still Relevant in the Contemporary Workplace in: Business and Management Discuss Marx's Theory of Alienation and Assess Whether It Is Still Relevant in the Contemporary Workplace

In: Business and Management

Submitted By ty9091
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Marx’s Alienation Theory

Introduction
To discuss the question whether Marx’s Alienation Theory is still relevant in the modern workplace, it is necessary to identify what Marx’s Alienation Theory is and how the theory changed in the past decades. Then I will discuss about the characteristics of modern workplace and try to analysis the situation from the alienation theory perspective. As conclusion, I will try to evaluate the relevance between the theory and the workplace.

Definition of Alienation

Alienation is the process whereby people become foreign to the world they are living in. more

The concept of alienation is deeply embedded in all the great religions and social and political theories of the civilised epoch, namely, the idea that some time in the past people lived in harmony, and then there was some kind of rupture which left people feeling like foreigners in the world, but some time in the future this alienation would be overcome and humanity would again live in harmony with itself and Nature.

Marx had a specific understanding of the very sharp experience of alienation which is found in modern bourgeois society. Marx developed this understanding through his critique of Hegel.

According to Hegel, through their activity, people created a culture which then confronted them as an alien force. But for Hegel human activity was itself but the expression of the Spirit (or Zeitgeist) which acted through people.

In the first place, Marx insisted that it was human labour which created culture and history, not the other way around; in other words spirit was a human product, not the other way around.

“Subjectivity is a characteristic of subjects and personality a characteristic of the person. Instead of considering them to be predicates of their subjects, Hegel makes the predicates independent and then lets them be subsequently and mysteriously…...

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