Do Nrms/Nams Attract More Members of the Poor and Deprived Classes? (18 Marks)

In: Social Issues

Submitted By gcoward1
Words 1814
Pages 8
Do NRMs/NAMs attract more members of the poor and deprived classes? (18 marks)
Deprivation is the lack of material benefits considered to be basic necessities in society, there are many different types of deprivation which will be discussed and analysed. Glock and Stark identified them to include gender; the disabled (organismic deprivation – mental/physical problems); ethical; social; or economic. The poor and deprived classes could include the working social class and ethnic minorities who are marginalised, and reject from wider society for example afro-Caribbean’s.
Barker has adopted the concept of new religious movements as an overarching idea that embraces both sects and cults, it is a more neutral term to highly negative meanings of sects and cults in popular culture. A new religious movement (NRM) is a religious community or spiritual group of modern origins, which has a peripheral place within its nation dominant religious culture. Wallis’s typology of NRMs looks at the relationship between wider society and sect’s, he identifies 3 – world affirming, world accommodating and world rejecting. World affirming NRMs try to gain the most from society, and seen as a less threatening ‘loose’ organisation for personal achievement. Specifically they lack religion and use internet and technology for contact, levitation or meditation are examples. World accommodating disagree with society but choose to accept it and live normal lives, they seek to restore faith and religion into society, and an example includes Neo-Pentecostalism, where they believe in speaking in tongues. Then there is world rejecting who are seen as the scariest to society as they make a strong commitment to their movement, disowning family and friends. The Branch Davidians and the Moonies are examples of world rejecting movements. Wilson’s typology of NRMs include conversionists that see the world…...

Similar Documents

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Both Society as a Whole and Its Individual Members (18 Marks)"

...Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Both Society as a Whole and Its Individual Members (18 Marks)" Many functionalists argue that religion benefits both society as a whole as well as its individual members however other sociologists may oppose this view and claim that those who do actually benefit from religion this is at the expense of others, this in itself contradicts many of the beliefs set out in religions themselves. The consensus view as posed by functionalists presents religion in a far more positive light in comparison to that put forward by Marxists and feminists for example. As in Item A, stating that religion integrates individuals into a community by instilling into them a set of shared beliefs that gives them a feeling of belonging and common identity supporting the view that religion does benefit society as a whole. On the other hand it can be viewed that those who benefit from religion is in fact at the expense of others, as stated in Item A line 5. This contradicts the positive view towards religion and poses it in a much more negative light. From a functionalist perspective, Emile Derkheim defines religion in terms of the contribution it makes to social integration, rather than any specific belief in God or the supernatural. However this can be counter-argued in that just because an institution helps integrate individuals into groups this does not mean it is a religion. To try and come to a......

Words: 645 - Pages: 3

“Cleisthenes Reforms Gave the Poor More Rights Than Solon Had Done.” to What Extent Do You Agree with This Opinion?

...“Cleisthenes reforms gave the poor more rights than Solon had done.” To what extent do you agree with this opinion? I think that Cleisthenes did give the poor more rights than Solon did. He went further than Solon did and reduced the gap between the poor and the wealthy by creating new demes based upon the area in which you lived rather than who your family were. Cleisthenes had gained power by promising to give the poor more power, in order to weaken his rival, Isagoras’ support in the political areas. This allowed him to have the backing of the majority of the Athenian citizens, as they were mostly poor. However, it also meant that he had to follow through with his promise otherwise he would have the citizens against him and his regime. In order to make sure that no one else could seize tyrannical power, new cults and military functions increased the unity of the new tribe. The loyalty of the new tribes was now to Attica and not to the noble families as they were grouped into three areas of Attica. The basis of the Boule was strengthened making it more difficult for ambitious tyrants to take power. Breaking up the demes broke the power of the nobles and the old ionic tribes they had dominated. Also, the Boule of 500 became open to all over 30, except thetes and was most likely selected by lot which gave no advantage to the aristocracy. They served for one year and reappointment was allowed once but not in consecutive years making it hard for individuals to dominate. The......

Words: 1024 - Pages: 5

Assess the View That New Religious Movements Are Mainly for the Middle Classes and the Young.

...for the middle classes and the young. A new religious movement is a spiritual organisation founded after world war 2. They do not only have their name 'new' because of this but also due to the way they present themselves as alternatives to traditional religions. I will begin to explore the view that these new religions are designed to appeal to the middle classes and the young. Movements set up before this time were either sects or cults. Although the definitions of these terms have developed over the years to result in different meanings and connotations, many sociologists have attempted to distinguish between the characteristics of each organisation. In 1981, Troeltsch said that the characteristics of a sect include attracting those from the lower classes and that young children cannot usually directly enter a sect. These aspects are already deemed to be contrasting with those of a NRM. A cult,,, on the other hand, has no single definition accepted by sociologists but are described by Bruce as being 'a loosely knit group organised around some common themes and interests but lacking any sharply defined and exclusive belief system.' Wallis arranged new religious movements into three categories; world rejecting, world accommodating and world affirming. World rejecting new religious movements are known for being critical of the outside world and therefore actively seek change. An example of a NRM that rejected the world was People's Temple (1931-1978.) This NRM ended at......

Words: 444 - Pages: 2

Pms? Do More!

...PMS? Do More! How was your first PMS experience? Was it heart-warming or traumatic? Did you have fun with it or wished it never happened? Are you ready to experience it? Let me tell you – my first experience was terrifying but because it happened I have to learn from it and I can only wish that my own daughter will never experience it. Fellow toastmasters and guests, good evening! Yes, my first PMS experience was traumatic and wet. Uhh, uhhh before your imagination jumps-off this building, let me clear your thoughts of what am I referring to as PMS. It’s my first experience of my dear Papa and Mama Squabble. I was still a little child, well, smaller and sexier than I am today, 6 years old to be exact, when I had witnessed them fought. I was right in front of them, when my mama gripped a bolo, used it to draw a line on the floor and furiously said to my father, “Don’t you dare cross this line or else I’ll kill you!”. Then, a deafening silence enveloped our home. I got so scared that I didn’t notice I wet my pants already. That was worst! We all know that getting into it with our spouse or partner is inevitable, and when you have kids, there’s a strong chance they’ll witness the arguing. So, what do we do? Dr. Judith Sherven, a psychologist and an expert in conflict resolution, author of the book Discovering the Magic at the Heart of your Differences, said that it’s wise and understandable that parents worry about fighting in front of their children, yet......

Words: 760 - Pages: 4

How to Make Research Classes More Beneficial

...1) To make it more relevant and useful , literature review sessions should be there specialization wise ,e.g. Separate h rm, finance, marketing literature review sessions taken by faculties who are specialized in that subject so that students are able to understand and appreciate the nuances in a better way . 2) If the specialization faculties can take classes for gap identification , developing research questions in their particular field only it will be very beneficial for students. Eg Finance faculty can take 2 examples in the field of finance of how to do gap identification , to develop research questions, how to write problem statement it shall be helpful. 3) As it happens in other university in every management subjects , selected readings of specified articles can be done by students which can be discussed in class by faculty and students to find out the latest trends in those areas . I have attached a sample for Organisational Behaviour followed 4) 5) If the students are given training in spss on a continuous basis from November –december session during the core paper time .they will be better able to understand it since they will have time to practice. 6) If the students are given a names of companies which can be approached forr interviews or questionnaires filling it shall be nice. 7) If a 4 days workshop can be conducted of how to develop and make a research paper and present it , it shall be really nice . which can be made......

Words: 348 - Pages: 2

Selling

...could be included in this definition through uniting people together. Durkheim conceded that the French Revolution (1789–99) had many religious characteristics, e.g. sacred symbols and moral obligations. 8 Some religions could be excluded if too many characteristics are included, while if too few characteristics are used then the term ‘religion’ could embrace almost any philosophy or belief system. 9 The first of the three characteristics might be an organised collection of individuals. However, this in itself does not exclude secular communities such as clubs and societies. Therefore a second characteristic could include having a shared system of beliefs. However, this is still problematic, as division characterises many religions with members not necessarily sharing the same beliefs, for example Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox Christians; Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims; or orthodox and liberal Jews. The final characteristic could be a set of approved activities and practices, but as with beliefs these can be highly variable even within the same religion. Exam-style question Here is a suggested plan of this question to give you guidance on how to answer such questions. Introduction • Religion is hard to define precisely because it means different things to different people, including sociologists, who use a range of functional, substantive or polythetic definitions. • It is also difficult, with superstitions in both primitive societies and postmodern societies,......

Words: 23899 - Pages: 96

Analyse the Possible Reasons Why Kevar Travel Plc. Wished to Make Its Workforce More Flexible? (18 Marks)

...and temporary workers. Implementing a core and peripheral strategy is one way to make the workforce more flexible. This is because it allows them to gain a core of skilled workers which are all kept on permanent full time contracts which keeps them motivated and secure within the company so they stay which is beneficial as it means lower levels of having to train to high levels. The peripheral aspect of the strategy allows them to hire when necessary whether its unskilled staff to account for increased demand or highly skilled staff for specialist problems. This is beneficial as it means they don’t have to employ all their staff permanently whilst still allowing them to respond to the flucations in demand for cheap holidays. Kevar Travel Plc has seen a high degree of fluctuation with demand for its product. This is due to seasonal demands, competitive power from rivals and also consumer tastes and fashions regarding holidays over recent years. A strategy that was proposed was to make the workforce more flexible. One way in which they implemented this is the relocation of head office from London to Stoke. They would then go on to create a new workforce plan, which would achieve more flexibility within the workplace, this was done by increasing temporary contracts from 9.2% in 2009-10 to 29.7% 2011-12. Making the company’s workforce strategy more flexible has its advantages and disadvantages. A benefit of a flexible workforce strategy is cutting costs, this......

Words: 850 - Pages: 4

Nothing to Do More Work

...while ensuring that the producer gets a major share of the price consumers pay, by cutting out middlemen. By reducing malpractices, it had helped dairy farmers direct their own development, placing control of the resources they create in their own hands. The bedrock of Operation Flood has been village milk producers' co-operatives, which procure milk and provide inputs and services, making modern management and technology available to members. Operation Flood's objectives included:  Increase milk production ("a flood of milk")  Augment rural incomes  Fair prices for consumers Ques 8 name sone disease of tolerant plant? Ans Callery pear Cotoneaster Azalea Elm Ques 9 what nano technology? Nanotechnology ("nanotech") is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. Ques 10 laproscopy? Laparoscopy is a surgery that uses a thin, lighted tube put through a cut (incision) in the belly to look at the abdominal organs or the female pelvic organs .Laparoscopy is used......

Words: 2274 - Pages: 10

History Could Attract More Tourist

...Emphasizing Butte’s rich history could attract many more tourists to the Mining City, according to the county historical preservation officer. Jim Jarvis, in a presentation Wednesday at the Archives, discussed various way of increasing tourism, like clearer, more unified signage, a more welcoming entrance to Uptown, and creating a heritage tourism council where members build a vision that sells Butte’s product — its history. Jarvis, who’s lived in Butte about 3½ years, said heritage tourism has been discussed in Butte over the past two decades, but solid plans haven’t really taken shape. Marketing, Jarvis said, has been the missing ingredient. Last year, a consultant helped update the 1993 Butte-Anaconda Regional Historic Preservation Plan. New plans include marketing strategies to attract tourists who drive through Butte — but don’t stop. Approximately three million nonresidents drive by Butte each year, mostly between May and October, Jarvis said. But less than 1 percent of those tourists stop. To attract visitors to “Montana’s Copperway,” Jarvis said it’s important to have a website, clear signage on the highway, and well-maintained historic features clearly marked by signs showing the way. Jarvis said his focus is on Uptown Butte. Plans for revitalizing the heritage on the hill could apply to the rest of Butte and Anaconda as well, he said. Pause Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%0:00 Fullscreen 00:00 Unmute Heritage......

Words: 297 - Pages: 2

Feminism and Ideology

...questions will focus on more than one area of the specification. The specification: The relationship between religious beliefs and social change and stability * Functionalism: conservative force, inhibition of change, collective conscience, Durkheim and totemism, anomie; civil religions * Marxism: religion as ideology, legitimating social inequality, disguising exploitation etc * Weber: religion as a force for social change: theodicies, the Protestant ethic * Neo-Marxism: religion used by those opposing the ruling class, liberation theology * Feminism: religious beliefs supporting patriarchy * Fundamentalist beliefs: rejecting change by reverting to supposed traditional values and practices. Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice * Typologies of religious organisations: churches, denominations, sects and cults, with examples of each New Religious Movements and typologies of NRMs eg world rejecting/accommodating/affirming; millenarian beliefs, with examples of each * New Age movements and spirituality, with examples * The relationship of these organisations to religious and spiritual belief and practice. The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices * Reasons why people join NRMs, NAMs and other organisations ...

Words: 23270 - Pages: 94

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere Asses the Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Both Society as a Whole and Its Individual Members (18 Marks)

...material from item a and elsewhere asses the functionalist view that religion benefits both society as a whole and its individual members (18 marks) Functionalists believe society is built up of different institutions that work together to make society work, religion is one of these institutions and helps society with its need for solidarity and social order. Like mentioned in Item A functionalists view religion as a positive thing and argue that it uses a shared set of norms and values to bring people together into a community. They say this gives everyone a sense of belonging which benefits both individuals and the community as a whole. Durkheim said the thing we need to understand is the difference between the sacred and the profane as this was a key element to religion. The sacred are items that are set apart from the others and inspire awe, fear and wonder whereas the profane are mundane everyday objects. He suggested the sacred objects represent society, and in turn, when they are being worshiped through rituals the members are worshipping society itself. He thought by looking at studies of the Arunta clan he could observe the features of religion. He found the clan members’ sacred item was the totem and when they gathered together to worship it through rituals they were worshipping society. The totem was a recognisable item and gave the members a better sense of belonging. Durkheim said the sacred symbols represent society’s collective conscience. This helps the......

Words: 872 - Pages: 4

Progress with Technology: Do More with Less

...Advancements in collecting information, spending cost, and daily incoming data is ever growing. Moving forward in business needs can and will grow your company. As the world evolves in many aspects of life, the needs of a company’s evolution are also a part of those changes. We once rode in horse and buggies and using that horsepower, developed into a much faster more efficient way of travel. Stepping into the technological world of business will also create that for your work environment. The components of the system that you recommend including input devices, output devices, and storage. There are multiple components to a system that allows you to get the best use of your computer. Common daily uses of mail, iCal and contacts are interchangeable between your Mac and PC. The compatibility of the Mac allows you to open most files from software that a PC uses. There are a number of input devices that can be useful to enhance your technology. The use of trackballs, multiple mouse options to suit the needs of the user, and scanners that will allow you to digitally store forms and paperwork. Sending these to different departments for their use decreases the need for paper and reduces storage room for paper files. Planning for the storage of these files is important. A structure for backing up information or data is a must and can benefit for a quick reference no matter the date of the file. Organizing the process is critical at the start of the implementation. ......

Words: 2426 - Pages: 10

Belief

...be included in this definition through uniting people together. Durkheim conceded that the French Revolution (1789–99) had many religious characteristics, e.g. sacred symbols and moral obligations. 8 Some religions could be excluded if too many characteristics are included, while if too few characteristics are used then the term ‘religion’ could embrace almost any philosophy or belief system. 9 The first of the three characteristics might be an organised collection of individuals. However, this in itself does not exclude secular communities such as clubs and societies. Therefore a second characteristic could include having a shared system of beliefs. However, this is still problematic, as division characterises many religions with members not necessarily sharing the same beliefs, for example Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox Christians; Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims; or orthodox and liberal Jews. The final characteristic could be a set of approved activities and practices, but as with beliefs these can be highly variable even within the same religion. Exam-style question Here is a suggested plan of this question to give you guidance on how to answer such questions. Introduction • Religion is hard to define precisely because it means different things to different people, including sociologists, who use a range of functional, substantive or polythetic definitions. • It is also difficult, with superstitions in both primitive societies and postmodern......

Words: 23898 - Pages: 96

Assess the Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Both Society as a Whole and Its Individual Members (18 Marks)

...Functionalists believe that religion is beneficial for both society as a whole and its individual members, this is because it unifies society and creates consensus, which in turn gives each individual member a source of support when they need it. However some theorists disagree with the functionalist ideology. Firstly, functionalist claim religion benefits society in a number of ways, it creates a sense of social solidarity, meaning a shared sense of identity, history, norms and values (a collective conscience). This is supported by item A, ‘religion's contribution to value consensus and social integration’. Functionalist explain that if all of a society's members are part of the same religion then they all share the same belief system, resulting in consensus between all of its members. The religious institution will teach its members the norms and values of the society they are in and the collective worship will bind societies members closer together, for example, people in Muslim countries who are part of the faith of Islam, understand it is normal to stop and pray 5 times a day and also that no-one should work on Friday however people in Christian countries understand the day of rest to be Sunday. Functionalist therefore claim members of a society have a collective conscience, they think in the same way, due to their shared norms and values. Functionalists also believe that religion unifies people; the functionalist Emile Durkheim studied an aboriginal tribe the......

Words: 847 - Pages: 4

Beliefs in Society

... because essay questions will focus on more than one area of the specification. The specification: The relationship between religious beliefs and social change and stability * Functionalism: conservative force, inhibition of change, collective conscience, Durkheim and totemism, anomie; civil religions * Marxism: religion as ideology, legitimating social inequality, disguising exploitation etc * Weber: religion as a force for social change: theodicies, the Protestant ethic * Neo-Marxism: religion used by those opposing the ruling class, liberation theology * Feminism: religious beliefs supporting patriarchy * Fundamentalist beliefs: rejecting change by reverting to supposed traditional values and practices. Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice * Typologies of religious organisations: churches, denominations, sects and cults, with examples of each New Religious Movements and typologies of NRMs eg world rejecting/accommodating/affirming; millenarian beliefs, with examples of each * New Age movements and spirituality, with examples * The relationship of these organisations to religious and spiritual belief and practice. The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices * Reasons why people join NRMs, NAMs and other organisations * Gender and...

Words: 23270 - Pages: 94