Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centered Therapy Offers the Therapist All That He/She Will Need to Treat Clients

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Evaluate the claim that Person-Centered Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients

Person-centered therapy, which is also known as client-centered, non-directive, or Rogerian therapy, is an approach to counseling and psychotherapy that places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a nondirective role. Developed in the 1930s by the American psychologist Carl Rogers, client-centered therapy departed from the typically formal, detached role of the therapist emphasized in psychoanalysis and other forms of treatment. Rogers believed that therapy should take place in a supportive environment created by a close personal relationship between client and therapist. Rogers's introduction of the term "client" rather than "patient" expresses his rejection of the traditionally hierarchical relationship between therapist and client and his view of them as equals. In person-centered therapy, the client determines the general direction of therapy, while the therapist seeks to increase the client's insight and self-understanding through informal clarifying questions. This essay will evaluate this type of therapy to establish if it is the only therapy needed by therapist to treat their clients.

Rogers was a humanistic therapist which differed greatly from other approaches at that time which were based on the psychodynamic ideas of Freud, Carl Yung, Alfred Adler and others. Person Centred Therapy is not active, challenging or involving role play such as Gestalt and REBT but is more passive and accompanies the client at the clients pace not the therapists. The focus lies on the goodness of humanity, as well as the free will to change. He agreed with most of what Maslow believed, but added that for a person to "grow", they need an environment that provides them with genuineness, acceptance and…...

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Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centred Therapy Offers the Therapist All He/She Will Need to Treat Clients.”

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