Gestalt and Client Centered Therapy

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By omega5
Words 5077
Pages 21
Psychopathology
Specific Learning Disorders

Table of contents
Index Pages
Introduction 3
Diagnostic criteria 4
Aetiology 11
Differential diagnosis 14
Comorbodity 16
Prevalence 16
Prevention and Treatment 17
Prognosis 18
Multicultural factors 19
Social factors 19
Conclusion 20
References 21

Stupid
Slow
Stubborn
A tiny fragment of words used, labels for children and people with specific learning disorders. If only they understood
Introduction
The most basic definition of a specific learning disorder/disability according to Gould (2005) cited in Rörich (2008) is when a learner has an average to above average intelligence, with normal vision and hearing, and receives the same teaching experiences as other learners his age. He, however, underachieves. He is unable to keep up with his peers and generally cannot cope with the demands of the school (pp16).
Margari (2013) defines SLD’s as that which are characterizations of academic functioning that are below the level that would be expected given their age, Intelligent Quotient and grade level in school, and interfere significantly with academic performances or daily life activities that require reading, writing or calculation skills.
The gist of it, is that specific learning disorders are neurodevelopmental/cognitive disorders that Hulme and Snowling (2009,pp22) define as “typically characterized by slow rates of development, either in specific domain (specific learning disabilities such as dyslexia or mathematics disorder) or more generally across many domains (general learning difficulties or mental retardation).
Finally, Rorich (2008, pp16) explains that the South African contexts defines these, as barriers to learning or learning disabilities in which then a "Specific learning…...

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