History of Race Relations in Ohio

In: English and Literature

Submitted By jim45682
Words 1487
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History of Race Relations in Ohio
James Candler
ETH-125
February 5 2012
Loren Butler

History of Race Relations in Ohio
The great state of Ohio, the heart of it all. You know, in my travels around our nation both in the military, and as a truck driver, I found that no matter where you go you will always run into someone who is or was from Ohio. Home to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the Pro Football Hall of Fame, in addition to four U.S. Presidents.
Demographically speaking, Ohio is a majority White state and has always been majority White, with Hispanics making up the second largest group, then Blacks, Asians, and Native Americans. The current trending shows that Hispanics are the fastest growing group in Ohio, having surpassed Blacks just in the last ten years. In my experience around Ohio most of the minority population is concentrated around the urban centers of the state, leaving many rural communities (like the one I grew up in, and my current one) to be completely White, with no minorities at all. This can be cause for concern over race relations because without exposure to these minority groups there can be no education and understanding of them, leading to hereditary prejudices surfacing when exposure is finally forced.
In 1959 the state of Ohio enacted the Ohio Civil Rights Act of 1959 to "prevent and eliminate the practice of discrimination in employment against persons because of their race, color, religion, national origin, or ancestry." The Civil Rights Act also guaranteed all people fair access to public facilities and private businesses. The Ohio Civil Rights Act established the Ohio Civil Rights Commission to help eliminate discrimination in Ohio.
A little known fact, Ohio had the very first African American mayor of any major U.S. city. In 1967, Carl B. Stokes was elected mayor of Cleveland Ohio, and served until 1971. Also during…...

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