Impacts of Migration: Focus on the Philippines

In: Social Issues

Submitted By bangcheosseo
Words 14243
Pages 57
OUTLINE:
Topic - Impact of Migration: Focus on Philippines
I. Introduction Ia. Defining Migration a.1 Kinds of Migration a.2 Who are Migrants a.3 Factors of Migration a.4 Reasons for Migration
II. Review of Related Literature
III. History of Migration and its Policies III.a. Migration Policies - Critique III.b. Statistics b.1.Number of Migrants b.2.Main destinations b.3.Occupations b.4.Sex b.5.Remittances III.c. Case Study c.1. Flor Contemplacion c.2. Angelo Dela Cruz c.3. Rodelio “Dondon” Lanuza
IV. Impact of Saudization to Filipino OFWs
V. Impact of Migration V.a. Impact of Migration to the Sending State a.1 Positive effects a.2 Negative effects V.b. Impact of Migration to the Receiving State b.1. Positive effects b.2. Negative effects
VI. Implication of the Effects to the Philippines (Actions made to combat negative migration effects)
VII. Implications of Migration to the Youth - Youth Migration
VIII. Migration and Filipino Family Life, Society and Culture VIII.a. Effects on the family of an OFW VIII.b. Migration and Filipino Society
IX. Solving Migration Problems
X. Conclusion

I. Introduction What is migration? According to National Geographic, Human Migration is the movement of people from one place to another for the purpose work or permanent residence in a country either cross boundary or just within the state. There are several types of migration: (1) Internal Migration, which is simply migration happening within a state. (2) External Migration of international migration, which means…...

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