Intimate Partner Violence (Ipv)

In: Other Topics

Submitted By manimuthu
Words 774
Pages 4
Introduction
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious avoidable social problem which affects the community. The term “intimate partner violence” means physical, sexual or psychological harm by a spouse or domestic partner. Intimate partner violence occurs when two people come in a close relationship. Usually, it begins with emotional abuse and proceeds to physical or sexual abuse. IPV has a serious impact on women’s health especially from all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. As per American Nurses Association, IPV is responsible for 30% of female homicides. The most common mental health consequence of abuse is depression. According to CDC the cost of IPV is approximately 8.3 billion for medical, mental hygiene and lost productivity. IPV is connected to harmful health behaviors. Victims may try to adjust their stress in unhealthy ways such as smoking and drinking. The primary goal of IPV is prevention before the occurrence. Previous studies have shown that nurses working in primary health care settings are not well trained enough to identify and provide proper intervention to IPV. When the abuse remains undetected the victim may face long term consequences. The aim of the study was to assess nurses’ awareness and early detection of IPV and to also provide appropriate care to victims who visit the primary care settings.
Protection of Human Participants
The participants of the research were told about their voluntary participation and withdrawal from the study at any time. Participants were informed that all collected information will be kept confidential. Moreover, the volunteers were alerted that the study could bring up some depressing memories so lists of psychological support centers were also included in the study. Approval from the appropriate Ethical Board at Karolinska Institute, Stockholm was obtained prior to the study.
Method of the Study
The data…...

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