Jonathan Livingston Seagull Reflection

In: Novels

Submitted By sielsie
Words 346
Pages 2
Jonathan Livingston Seagull Reflection

Jonathan Livingston Seagull
Richard Bach

The novel Jonathan Livingston Seagull is a very fantastic novel. I have judged this novel very wrongly because I really thought that’s it’s all just about a dump of boring seagulls that search for enlightenment and predictably ends finding it. But it wasn’t! It suddenly became one of my favorite novels of all time. Living in this world full of people, pretending to be something they’re not, I realized that every one of us is trying to fit in. For me, this novel will really help out those people who fear to be uncovered and I should know.

This novel is all about creativity and individuality. To stand up for something you strongly believe in is really brave indeed. Creativity, I should say, makes us smarter. Routine living dulls our mind. Creative expression gives our brain a workout, activating new circuits in our grey matter. Creativity does not necessarily require an act of will or sweat on the brow. It’s about getting beyond logic and to see more than meets the eye. Creativity asks us to change the way we live our lives, to turn away from the “normal” way of doing things and express individuality. Conformity isn’t creative. Neither is routine. Jonathan did exactly the same. He turned away from the norm and started up all on his own as an outcast. Later, he found out the true meaning of life which is to touch perfection and show it forth. All this he learned in a very dramatic way. He meets this powerful seagull, Chiang, and gained friends who became his great teachers and taught him many things about love and kindness.

The very key learning in this novel for me is COMMUNICATION. We communicate when there is mutual understanding of the message and meanings. Unless you have been understood, you have not yet communicated. Communication is the transfer and…...

Similar Documents

A Most Proposal Jonathan Swift

...A Modest Proposal to End Poverty When reading the 1729 proposal written by Jonathan Swift a lot of thoughts can arise in a grueling manner. How could anyone conclude that eating and selling adolescents for humans to consume can actually become the elucidation to end such poverty and over-population in Ireland? The conception is iniquitous and brazen at so many levels, especially if it was a concrete idea for the government to execute in an immoral way. While I construe Swift’s proposal as time went on I began to understand the point of view of why it lead to contemplation of figuring out how to control such devastations. I can say Swift was appalled at the upper class’s treatment of the poor, and is affront by their objections to even having to look at them. This shows me that Swift had a luminous idea of how the rich looked upon the poor as human beings. As I read on I can definitely see the sardonic tone when Swift proposes that everyone just consume adolescents, which would provide commerce and money to the impecunious families who sell their babies, and of course rid them of the need to feed that child in the first place. I can vouch for a lot of people who reads Swift’s proposal and immediately thinks he’s actually austere when it came to those mind boggling acts. I think a savvy reader will find some clues of the satirical tone. Some examples had me rethink what I might of thought before, the first one is when Swift talks about the landlords (the English people......

Words: 567 - Pages: 3

Jonathan Swift's a Modest Propsal

...“A Modest Proposal,” is a satirical essay written and published by Jonathan Swift in 1729. Swift was a Protestant, but he was also a native of Ireland, having been born in Dublin of English parents, and was one of the most satirical writers of his time. Swift believed that the population of Catholic children in Ireland was creating an economic problem as well as being a burden on their parents and country. So Swift came up with a proposal that would satirize the English landlords with outrageous humor. He propose, jokingly, that Irish infants be sold as food at age one, when they are plump and healthy, to give the Irish a new source of income and the English a new food product to bolster their economy and eliminate a social problem. He says his proposal, if adopted, would also result in a reduction in the number of Catholics in Ireland. He also believed England was exploiting Ireland. Many Irishmen worked farms owned by Englishmen who charged high rents so high that the Irish were frequently unable to pay them. Consequently, many Irish farming families lived on the edge of starvation. Here, he is satirizing the rivalry and prejudice characterizing Catholic-Protestant relations in Britain. Swift also satirizes the Irish themselves in his essay, for too many of them had accepted abuse stoically rather than taking action on their own behalf. . He believes that English overlords are shamelessly exploiting the impoverished people of Ireland. He believed in order to fix...

Words: 290 - Pages: 2

"A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift

...“A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift In Jonathan Swift’s essay “A Modest Proposal” he provides a satirical look at how to address the issue of the poor in Ireland. Poverty, however, is not the only issue of his time as there is also a question of moral issues among the people, both poor and rich. The focus of Swift’s writing is to unburden both parents and the economy of the over population of children, “instead of being a charge upon their parents or the parish, or wanting food and raiment for the rest of their lives, they shall on the contrary contribute to the feeding, and partly to the clothing, of many thousands” (Swift 3). Swift used this theme of unjust behavior to announce how tragic and real these issues were, he brought poverty into prospective and ridiculed society all at once. Swift starts out his proposal with a back ground description of just what it would be like to simply walk down a street in Ireland and see all the misfortune that was surrounding so many people. Poverty here was not a hidden problem it was not something that took investigation to see it was very noticeable yet no one was looking for a solution. It can be inferred that the upper class, a good example would be the landlords, were being greedy and irresponsible governing their land from England. Swift pokes fun at the landlords and England’s mistreatment of Ireland in general when he states “I grant this food may be somewhat dear, and therefore very proper for landlords, who, as they......

Words: 463 - Pages: 2

Jonathan Edwards- Sciene and Religion

...English Department University of Heidelberg HS Literature: Science and Religion Instructor: Dr. Prof. Jan Stievermann WS 11/12 Jonathan Edwards: The Theory of Conversion and His Disposition towards Science Angela Abram Am Güterbahnhof 26, 69181 Leimen angeljoy89@yahoo.com English philology, semester: 5 Matriculation number: 2828314 April 9th, 2012 1. Introduction 3 2. Jonathan Edwards 4 2.1. His Life and Calling 2.2. The Conversion Experience 6 3. Edward’s Disposition towards Science 10 3.1. Science as a Way to Know God     3.2. Book of Nature vs. Book of God 13 4. Is Empiricism Important? 14 5. Jonathan Edwards: A Scientist and Christian 18 6. Conclusion 21 Bibliography 23 Honor Pledge 24 1. Introduction Throughout the centuries the relationship between science and religion has been at times harmonious and at other times at odds with each other. Even today we still find many religious groups who see science as a threat to their belief system. Among these groups are Evangelical Christians. We hear of concerned mothers protesting against the teaching of evolution in front schools, pastors warning their congregation about the dangers of science and many more instances of believer trying to “fight against” scientific findings that are not compatible with the word of God. However, a closer look reveals that there...

Words: 9972 - Pages: 40

Jonathan Livingston Seagull

...This is a story for people who follow their dreams and make their own rules; a story that has inspired people for decades. For most seagulls, life consists simply of eating and surviving. Flying is just a means of finding food. However, Jonathan Livingston Seagull is no ordinary bird. For him, flying is life itself. Against the conventions of seagull society, he seeks to find a higher purpose and become the best at doing what he loves. This is a fable about the importance of making the most of our lives, even if our goals run contrary to the norms of our flock, tribe or neighbourhood. Through the metaphor of flight, Jonathan’s story shows us that, if we follow our dreams, we too can soar. ‘Richard Bach with this book does two things. He gives me Flight. He makes me Young. For both I am deeply grateful.’ RAY BRADBURY Jonathan Livingston Seagull a story RICHARD BACH PHOTOGRAPHS BY RUSSELL MUNSON The most celebrated inspirational fable of our time Element An Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers 77-85 Fulham Palace Road Hammersmith, London W6 8JB The website address is: www.thorsonselement.com To the real Jonathan Seagull, who lives within us all and Element are trademarks of HarperCollinsPublishers Ltd First published in Great Britain by Turnstone Press 1972 This edition published by Element 2003 17 19 21 23 25 24 22 20 18 16 Text copyright © Richard D. Bach 1970 Photographs copyright © Russell Munson 1970 Richard Bach asserts the moral right to be identified as......

Words: 9512 - Pages: 39

Jonathan Swift

...4. Jonathan Swift (1667—1745) the foremost prose satirist in the English language His Writing The Battle of Books (1704) A Tale of Tub (1704) the Drapier’s Letters (1724) Gulliver’s Travels (1726) A Modest Proposal (1729) Gulliver’s Travels a collection of tales tied together by Gulliver a novel a satire a travel book a children book an allegory Satire A common form of the 18th Century, basically the ridiculing of any objects through laughter which will soften the blow The Structure of Gulliver’s Travels Book I about Liliputians in Liliput, being morally trivial and full of pride. Book II about the giants in Brobdingnag in the sense of magnanimity & grandeur, goodness & decency. ※The first two books reflect the kind of political infighting that characterizes the early 18th century. Book III about pseudo-philosophers & scientists in Laputa. ※ contemporary scientists are held up to ridicule. Book IV about the country of the Houyhnhnms endowed with reason in the contrast with the Yahoos, beasts in the shape of men. ※ Horses are endowed with reason, unlike the depraved all-too-human Yahoos, but reason is clearly not the only thing that matters in life. As a political & social satire actually a biting work of political and social satire parodying popular travelogues of his day in creating this story of travels to imaginary foreign lands. satirizing the political events in England and Ireland in his day, English values and......

Words: 1099 - Pages: 5

Jonathan Livingston Seagull

...This is a story for people who follow their dreams and make their own rules; a story that has inspired people for decades. For most seagulls, life consists simply of eating and surviving. Flying is just a means of finding food. However, Jonathan Livingston Seagull is no ordinary bird. For him, flying is life itself. Against the conventions of seagull society, he seeks to find a higher purpose and become the best at doing what he loves. This is a fable about the importance of making the most of our lives, even if our goals run contrary to the norms of our flock, tribe or neighbourhood. Through the metaphor of flight, Jonathan’s story shows us that, if we follow our dreams, we too can soar. ‘Richard Bach with this book does two things. He gives me Flight. He makes me Young. For both I am deeply grateful.’ RAY BRADBURY Jonathan Livingston Seagull a story RICHARD BACH PHOTOGRAPHS BY RUSSELL MUNSON The most celebrated inspirational fable of our time Element An Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers 77-85 Fulham Palace Road Hammersmith, London W6 8JB The website address is: www.thorsonselement.com To the real Jonathan Seagull, who lives within us all and Element are trademarks of HarperCollinsPublishers Ltd First published in Great Britain by Turnstone Press 1972 This edition published by Element 2003 17 19 21 23 25 24 22 20 18 16 Text copyright © Richard D. Bach 1970 Photographs copyright © Russell Munson 1970 Richard Bach asserts the moral right to be identified as......

Words: 9512 - Pages: 39

The Symbolism Concepts in Chekhov’s the Seagull

...The Symbolism Concepts in Chekhov’s The Seagull Introduction Anton Chekhov was categorised as a realistic writer. His drama scripts also are realistic. The plot in his scripts describes a short fragment of ordinary lives from ordinary people. But his realism is not completely as same as traditional realism, which contains a lot of symbolism concepts. The traditional realistic play sees life in terms of what it might be, as well as in terms of what it is through an objective view (Sprinchorn 1124). Also, the visual description of characters’ personality and plot details are necessary in realistic drama play. In Chekhov’s play, it is hard to easily judge the character good or bad. And the plots are not developed with strong conflict as tradition dramatic realism. Also, his play cannot be presented as the same method as traditional plays. Chekhov’s plays have transcended the definition of realism because he already achieved a series of symbolist concepts in them. His plays can be regard as combinational works of realism and symbolism, which is different to previous playwrights’. Tolstoy has commented that: He cannot even be compared with the old Russian writers — Turgenev, Dostoevsky, or myself. Chekhov has his own manner, like the Impressionists. You see a man daubing on whatever paint happens to be near at hand, apparently without selection, and it seems as though these paints bear no relation to one another. But if you step back a certain distance and look again, you...

Words: 2277 - Pages: 10

Temple of Jonathan

...“The Temple of Jonathan” (The Muse’s Hegemon) Jon Peterson 4/17/15 The Temple of Jonathan was erected in Olympia, Greece in the fourth century BCE. It is believed to have been built by the citizens of Olympia during the Late Classical Period which was between 400-323 BCE. Shortly after the Persians Wars had ended, the citizens built the Temple of Zeus which the citizens modeled this temple after. While the Temple of Zeus was built to showcase the power of Zeus, Apollo and Athena, the Temple of Jonathan was built to bring calmness and peace to the city. The temple had been built in a Doric hybrid style and was erected near the Sanctuary of Zeus. The reason the citizens of Olympia decided to erect it near the sanctuary of Zeus is because Jonathan was appointed by Zeus to be the second leader (hegemon) of his nine daughters, The Muses. Although Apollo was the initial appointed leader of the Muses, he was not to be bothered by trivial things. Zeus felt his daughters needed a second male leader over them that could handle the daughters calmly because at times they argued relentlessly over trivial issues. Zeus wanted clam and peace among his daughters that ruled over the arts and sciences. The daughters offered inspiration in the subjects of Arts and Sciences and Zeus thought that these daughters must remain calm in their influence of the people. The temple design not only encompassed the Doric style but also incorporated some of the features of the Ionic and Corinthian......

Words: 1199 - Pages: 5

Jonathan Edwards Theology

...Jonathan Edwards’ Theology One cannot study church history without looking at the key figure, Jonathan Edwards. One very significant aspect of Edwards was his theology. This is beneficial for us to study for a few reasons. The first being Jonathan Edwards’ view of his own sin, second, Edwards’ example of preaching both God’s wrath and love, and finally, Edwards’ held to a healthy balance of Calvinistic theology. Edwards was very aware of his own sin. He is quoted saying, "I know not how to express better what my sins appears to me to be than heaping infinite upon infinite." This theological view helped him to see Christ more precious to him. Today we could benefit from this especially in a society that minimizes sin. Edwards is most known for preaching the wrath of God in his sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” but he also preached the equally the love for God in sermons like, “Charity and its Fruits”. We should also preach all the attributes of God today so our people have a full view of Him. Edwards also held to a strict reformed, puritan, Calvinistic theology, but at the same time, he called people to repent. Edwards also had a heart for the lost and for missions, especially to the Indians. He did not take the dangerous view of, “when God is pleased to convert the heathen world; He will do it without your help or mine.” We should study Edwards’ theology to see how one can have a balanced view of God’s sovereignty and man’s responsibility....

Words: 263 - Pages: 2

Seagull

...so Funny? Section 1 As depressing as Chekov’s The Seagull is with attempted and successful suicides, hopeless love triangles, and lack of healthy relationships between almost every single character; I personally enjoyed it. Don’t get me wrong, I felt the sadness and hopelessness of the characters and plot, however, it was almost the pure paradoxical mannerisms that allowed me to actually enjoy it. It was almost as if every single character set up or created their own happiness and in some alternate reality the sad ending of the play could have been avoided. This was my reaction from just reading it. Upon actually watching the play in class, all of my inhibitions and fear of being judged for my cruel sense of humor dissipated. Physically watching the play made my thoughts more apparent and clear. I really started to feel badly for Nina due to the fact that she was, in a sense, stripped of her innocence, whereas reading it made me dislike her naivety. Section 2 In Anton Chekov’s The Seagull, there can be many debate as to what the genre of the play falls into. Some argue it is pure tragedy, others argue drama, but there are others, including Chekov, that argue it is a comedy. While these are very matter of fact and binary answers, I argue that the genre is not so black and white. Due to the paradoxical characters and their tragic demise, the genre of The Seagull can be categorized as a, “tragicomedy.” The Seagull possesses many elements of tragedy such as:......

Words: 542 - Pages: 3

Reflections

...Read the following articles from Unit 5, jotting down your first impressions of each article to use in the reflections. * Sleeping with Guns by Bruce Holbert * My Daughter Smokes by Alice Walker * A Drunken Ride, A Tragic Aftermath by Theresa Conroy and Christine M. Johnson * Young and Isolated by Jennifer M. Silva Sleeping With Guns By BRUCE HOLBERT THE summer before my sophomore year in high school, I moved into my father’s house. My father had remarried and the only unoccupied bedroom in his house was the gun room. Against one wall was a gun case he had built in high school, and beside it were two empty refrigerators stocked with rifles and hundreds of rounds of ammunition. My bed’s headboard resided against the other wall and, above it, a resigned-looking, marble-eyed, five-point mule deer’s head with a fedora on its antler rack. The room had no windows, so the smell of gun oil filled my senses at least eight hours each day. It clung to my clothes like smoke, and like a smoker’s cigarettes, it became my smell. No one in my high school noticed. We all smelled like something: motorheads of motor oil, farm kids of wheat chaff and cow dung, athletes like footballs and grass, dopers like the other kind of grass. It did not appear to anyone — including me — that residing within my family’s weapons cache might affect my life. Together, my three brothers own at least a dozen weapons and have yet to harm anyone with them. Despite their guns (or, arguably,......

Words: 6088 - Pages: 25

Jonathan Swift

...Jonathan Swift 1. Swift wrote "A Modest Proposal" under a pseudonym, so who is the speaker here? The speaker is a Protestant and a member of the Irish upper class. 2. Discuss the tone of the piece. Pull examples from the text to support your discussion. Swift showed disgust for the people who would rather beg than take care of themselves. He says, “These mothers instead of being able to work for their honest livelihood, are forced to employ all their time in strolling to beg sustenance for their helpless infants who, as they grow up, either turn thieves for want of work, or leave their dear native country, to fight for the Pretender in Spain, or sell themselves to the Barbados.” 3. As you know, effective argumentation appeals to logic (logos), ethics (ethos) and emotions (pathos). Please discuss how Swift uses all three appeals and how these tools impact his purpose. Swift appeals to logic by stating the issue at hand. He also appeals to logic by asking why it is the public’s responsibility to take care of these needy families. Swift appeals to pathos and ethos through the diction he uses when describing the problem. He wants the situation to change but he wants it to change for every party. 4. Explain the irony in Swift’s title, "A Modest Proposal." The title is ironic because the proposal is anything but modest. Swift presets an outrageous solution to an ongoing problem. His proposal calls attention to this problem in an extremely eye-catching way. He......

Words: 932 - Pages: 4

Jonathan Livingston Seagull Reflection

...Jonathan Livingston Seagull Richard Bach The novel Jonathan Livingston Seagull is a very fantastic novel. I have judged this novel very wrongly because I really thought that’s it’s all just about a dump of boring seagulls that search for enlightenment and predictably ends finding it. But it wasn’t! It suddenly became one of my favorite novels of all time. Living in this world full of people, pretending to be something they’re not, I realized that every one of us is trying to fit in. For me, this novel will really help out those people who fear to be uncovered and I should know. This novel is all about creativity and individuality. To stand up for something you strongly believe in is really brave indeed. Creativity, I should say, makes us smarter. Routine living dulls our mind. Creative expression gives our brain a workout, activating new circuits in our grey matter. Creativity does not necessarily require an act of will or sweat on the brow. It’s about getting beyond logic and to see more than meets the eye. Creativity asks us to change the way we live our lives, to turn away from the “normal” way of doing things and express individuality. Conformity isn’t creative. Neither is routine. Jonathan did exactly the same. He turned away from the norm and started up all on his own as an outcast. Later, he found out the true meaning of life which is to touch perfection and show it forth. All this he learned in a very dramatic way. He meets this powerful seagull,......

Words: 470 - Pages: 2

Seagull

...------------------------------------------------- Plot The book tells the story of Jonathan Livingston Seagull, a seagull who is bored with the daily squabbles over food. Seized by a passion for flight, he pushes himself, learning everything he can about flying, until finally his unwillingness to conform results in his expulsion from his flock. An outcast, he continues to learn, becoming increasingly pleased with his abilities as he leads an idyllic life. One day, Jonathan is met by two gulls who take him to a "higher plane of existence" in that there is no heaven but a better world found through perfection of knowledge, where he meets other gulls who love to fly. He discovers that his sheer tenacity and desire to learn make him "pretty well a one-in-a-million bird." In this new place, Jonathan befriends the wisest gull, Chiang, who takes him beyond his previous learning, teaching him how to move instantaneously to anywhere else in the Universe. The secret, Chiang says, is to "begin by knowing that you have already arrived." Not satisfied with his new life, Jonathan returns to Earth to find others like him, to bring them his learning and to spread his love for flight. His mission is successful, gathering around him others who have been outlawed for not conforming. Ultimately, the very first of his students, Fletcher Lynd Seagull, becomes a teacher in his own right and Jonathan leaves to teach other flocks. Part One Part One of the book finds young Jonathan Livingston......

Words: 728 - Pages: 3