Methods of Psychology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By Danny1091
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The subject of psychology has been a pillar among education both socially and experimentally. The meaning of psychology is, “The scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context”. (Oxford Dictionary) The effects that psychology has on society are innumerable and are very pertinent in many situations. The research methods utilized in psychology are very rampant numbers all depending upon its kind. Each research method has its pros and cons which can offer both good and bad situations within psychology. While the research methods of psychology play a vital role in the existence of the subject, ethics play a very vital role as well. Ethics within psychology has become a very importance pillar in the psychology community considering some of the older research that was done in which ethics was not taken into account. There are research experiments that have been deemed as unethical and many of those same research experiments have set the precedent as to what will and will not be tolerated in psychology. Morals should always come first no matter what research is being done.

Psychology has many methods in which it can offer research however the most influential include correlational research, and experimental research. Correlational research usually measures the relationship between two variables however it cannot conclude the cause of that behavior between the two variables, in other words correlation does not produce causation. Correlation research includes surveys, case studies, laboratory observations, and naturalistic observations. Surveys are used in an effort to learn more about certain actions or events that may have taken place. Surveys usually contain a set of interview questions that allow subjects to answer accordingly. While surveys are a very widespread research method they can often…...

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