“Modernity Was an Abstract Belief System, Rooted in the Enlightenment. Which Drove Our Traditional Society Towards Technological Development, Industrialisation and Radical Social Change”? Assess the Impact of Modernity

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The European Enlightenment is the well known era in Western society. The Enlightenment was a study conducted by the philosopher Immanuel Kant in 1784. Kant's essay addressed the causes of a lack of enlightenment and the conditions that were necessary to make it possible for people to enlighten themselves. Kant held it necessary that all church and state to be abolished and people be given the freedom to use their own intellect.
Hobbesian social control theory was a ideological invention that came about during the pre 1750s. The social control theory is a view that a person’s moral and political obligations are dependent upon a ‘contract’ or an agreement among that to form a society in which they live in. However, social contract theory is rightly associated with modern moral and political theory and is given its first full exposition and defence by Thomas Hobbes. After Hobbes, John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau are the best known proponents of this enormously influential theory, which has been one of the most dominant theories within moral and political theory throughout the history of the modern West. More recently, philosophers from different perspectives have offered new criticisms of social contract theory. In particular, feminist’s philosophers have argued that the social control theory is an incomplete picture of people’s moral and political lives and may camouflage some on the ways that people live and their classes. Hobbes manages to create an argument that makes civil society.
Naturalism is a theory that has developed from the ideas of Spinoza that holds that all phenomena can be explained mechanistically in terms of natural causes and laws. Naturalism states that the universe is a vast "machine," that doesn’t have general purpose and is different to human’s needs and desires. Naturalism does not deny the existence of God, however naturalism makes God…...

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