Movie Company Business Structure Case Study Analysis

In: Business and Management

Submitted By leopastro
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Movie Company Business Structure

Case Study Analysis

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Leopoldo Vendramin

ADVANCED BUSINESS STRUCTURES

Special thanks to Mr. Peter Butters
Academic Year 2010/2011- Term I
The movie company considered for this analysis, has recently acquired one of the major comic company of the world, the “Comedy Factory”. Is therefore being developed a business strategy, that serves to clarify the organizational structure at global level. The investment made, then as purpose, growth and expansion throughout the world, trying to revive the comic book characters (hidden for too long) and trying to exploit the licensing of the former company, implementing a new strategic plan of marketing and distribution of merchandise. As in the past, when Disney acquired Marvel, the CEO of Disney, Robert Iger said: “This treasure find of over 5,000 characters offers Disney the ability to do what we do best." (Robert Iger, 2009).

The organizational structure of a multinational company, requires a detailed treatment of the management and executive system. Therefore be able to build within a specific operating system, which limits the costs of each department to avoid the risk of confusing the various tasks.
The acquisition of Comedy Factory, leader in the field of comics, will help the movie company to implement and develop new projects in the film industry, entertainment and merchandise. “What I love about DC is that we're not a one-note business. We can be on-line, we can be CD-ROM, we can be video games and interactive toys, or we can be movies, television, animation. So the opportunities technology brings are all open to us, and each one of those different areas helps all the others— long as we never lose sight of the fact that the comics made all these other things possible.”(Jenette Kahn, President, DC Comics,2007).…...

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