Premium Essay

Non Practising Allowance - Bane of Indian Health System

In: Social Issues

Submitted By cmcrajeev
Words 467
Pages 2
Indian health services are being either provided by government hospitals (public hospitals) or by the hospitals run by the private sector. In the last 20 years we have seen that there has been massive proliferation in private health services available in the country. Same has been the trend in the medical education sector. Almost 50% of the all the existing medical colleges have come up in the last decade or so. It is presumed that no new government medical college has opened during the same period. Private health services have become popular and wherever possible, an Indian patient prefers to get his/her treatment done in the private sector. This trend has been observed over the last decade or two.
The question to be addressed by people at helm is why has this happened! Health is a state subject, not much funding available for government hospitals, apathy of the politicians and bureaucrats, corruption in purchases of medical equipment and drugs, lack of maintenance and biomedical engineering departments in the hospitals, poor facilities, dirty wards, unhygienic facilities and many more reasons can be attributed to this malady. However, in my opinion, it is introduction of Non Practicing Allowance or what is popularly called NPA is the root cause of this problem.

NPA was introduced in the late 60s to stop government-employed doctors from doing private practice within the boundaries of a government hospital. Before its introduction, doctors were allowed private practice in special OPDs in evenings, thus helping them augment their incomes as well providing more income to the government. As time passed, the low total remuneration of a doctor started having affects on maintenance of academic standards for doctors. Continuing medical education in the form of books, journals, attending workshops and conferences is a part and parcel of a doctors life. However to do…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Metro Rail System in India : Boon or Bane

...Metro rail systems: Boon or bane for urban India? Indian cities will begin operating metro rail transport systems in seven cities, which taking the total number of cities with such systems to 11. But some fear that the sleek trains will be unaffordable for the vast majority of city dwellers, where 77 per cent of the population lives on less than 20 rupees (S$ 0.45) a day. Mumbai - based civil engineer Sudhir Badami, said that the metro transport system might be viable to some extent in big cities, but certainly not in smaller cities. They are already struggling to find money to provide their basic facilities such as piped drinking water, sanitation, education and health care. Others also think that building a metro network takes too long and is too disruptive. In contrast a bus system can be put in place within a year with minimal disturbance. They also believed a well – planned bus system can carry 30,000 commuters an hour. It is the same number as a metro rail system. In contrast, the director of urban development ministry in New Delhi, Prakash Singh said that buses are not feasible in some cities. He thought that cities needs additional land to widen existing roads and create a dedicated bus corridor. But, a separate, dedicated corridor was carved out from the existing road and ended up creating chaos on the road as other vehicle had to make do with much narrower road. In my opinion, the government in India should still create the metro rail transport system but with......

Words: 417 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

The Burgeoning Indian Health Insurance Industry:

...Note: The paper emphasizes on the role of all the stake holders of the health insurance industry, with particular focus on Policyholders perceptions on Health insurance based on household survey. The Burgeoning Indian Health Insurance Industry: ……...Yet miles to go!!! By *V. Jayalakshmi (M.Phil, LLB, FIIII(Non-Life)) __________________________________________________________________ * Assistant Professor, Siva Sivani Institute of Management, Kompally, Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. Pursuing Ph D from Osmania University, jayalakshmi@ssim.ac.in *This paper was presented at the National Seminar on Health Insurance “A Decade of Experience: Health Care Insurance… Present Scenario”, in Hyderabad on 24th January, 2012. The Burgeoning Indian Health Insurance Industry: ……...Yet miles to go!!! Introduction Health insurance has become one of the fastest growing segments in the non-life insurance industry in India in the recent years, experiencing a robust sixty per cent remarkable growth during 2007 – 08 over the past year. From a modest premium volume of Rs. 675 crore in 2001- 02 the health insurance premium has grown to Rs. 7803 crores in year 2009-2010, and is poised to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 25 to 30 per cent to reach a market size of around Rs 28,000 crore by financial year (FY) 2015 as per IRDA estimates. This segment is also emerging...

Words: 5563 - Pages: 23

Premium Essay

Indian Education Systems

...India has one of the largest populations in the entire world, and with that comes the second largest education system in the word. It is estimated that around thirty percent of India's population is under the age of fifteen[1], thus more children in the education systems. The large education system in India has not always had the best of reputations, and still does not hold a very reputable name for itself. Though there has been strides for improvements in the system of education for India in the last decade, the fundamentals of the law on education is where the main issue lies. There have been many changes to the education system of India in the years since their independence, but there is not much to show for the changes that have been made to their system since the quality of education material, as well as the quality of educators has made little improvement. The education system in India saw many changes shortly after colonial times, and have continued to change since then but the changes have not made as large of an impact as they should have. Many people see the education in India as inadequate, which it may certainly be. Before the British East India Company took the steps to intervene into the educational system, education had little to do with government. The education of India has an interesting history. It is believed by many historians that in the ancient days, the material that was to be taught was done so by word of mouth and was to be taught by the sages and...

Words: 2869 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Indian Banking System

...INDIAN BANKING SYSTEM – ROLE AND CHALLENGES Banking Industry creates a chain of economic activity in the country. When a bank lends, it is followed by a number of activities like investment, production, employment etc., finally the effect of it is reflected on the economy. The economic implications of banking activity can be mentioned as removal of poverty, promotion of employment opportunities, encouraging savings, improving capital market etc., with more banking activity, economic growth in the country will speed up leading to more economic development. BANKING HISTORY Bank of Hindustan was set up in 1870.It was the earliest Indian Bank. Later three presidency banks were set up in 1876.Bank of Calcutta, Bank of Bombay and Bank of Madras which laid the foundations for Modern Banking in India. In 1921 all presidency banks were amalgamated to form the imperial bank of India. It engaged in all types of commercial banking business except dealing in foreign exchange. RBI Act was passed in 1934 and it was constituted as an apex body without major government ownership. Banking regulation Act was passed in 1949. This regulation brought RBI under government control. In 1955 RBI acquired control of the Imperial Bank of India which was renamed as State Bank of India. The Narasimha committee report suggested wide reforms for the banking sector in 1992 to introduce internationally accepted banking practices. As a result the year 1993 saw the......

Words: 2293 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Indian Caste System and Varna

...INDIAN CASTE AND VARNA SYSTEM India is a diverse nation and one of the most prominent historical features of this country is its caste system. Under this caste system, people are divided and differentiated on the basis of region, class, place of birth, language, religion, tribe and gender. This caste system is seen as a tool to intricately stratified social hierarchy which plays a key role in distinguishing the culture of our nation from any other in this entire world. It has a history which is multi-dimensional and multifarious and is considered as the sole basis of a methodical ranking system on the basis of your occupation and inequality among the people, which is the root cause of the problem of inequality of the society. According to this caste system, the social standing of a person should be decided on the basis of the caste in which he is born in. To study the history of caste system in India, we must first study the history of Hinduism. The definition of ‘caste’ should be considered before studying about the Caste system of India. Caste can be defined as “a collection of families or groups of families bearing a common name; claiming a common descent from a mythical ancestor, human or divine; professing to follow the same hereditary calling; and regard by those who are capable to give an opinion as forming a single homogeneous community”. It can also be defined as an hierarchal division of different parts of the society on the basis of their occupation and place......

Words: 2550 - Pages: 11

Free Essay

Health System

...Health Care System Evolutions Paper University of Phoenix History and Overview of the U.S. Health Care System HCS 310 Karen Solorio February 16, 2009 Introduction on Code of Ethics In today’s current business environment, many challenges are in demand for the professional conduct of special healthcare specialty. I will review Manitoba Chiropractors’ Association Code of Ethics. I will review and discuss certain guidelines such as their clarity of goals, ethical principles, grievance procedures, feasibility of enforcing either part of the code or the entire code and my recommendation for strengthening potential weak areas of their code. Clarity of Goals Manitoba code of ethics is based on a set of principles that will establish requirements and its expectation for their chiropractors to fulfill its duties to their patients, the public, and to their colleagues. Because the code addresses broad ethical obligations, the onus is on individual chiropractors to maintain a working knowledge of, and comply with, the legislation and policies in the workplace and jurisdictions in which they practice (www.mbchiro.gov 2008). Manitoba affirms that its goal is to affirm and clarify principles that are definite to their professional and ethical care. Identified ethical principles Manitoba has identified five principles in its guidelines that will form their code of ethics. 1. Patient autonomy and informed consent; members of the......

Words: 764 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Indian Financial System

...INDIAN FINANCIAL SYSTEM 1. The Financial System – Nature, Evolution and Structure 1.1 The Nature of Financial System What is a Financial System? A system is generally defined as an ordered, organized and comprehensive assemblage of facts, principles or components relating to a particular field and working for a specified purpose. A Financial System aims at proper redistribution of surplus financial resources for the equitable growth of an economy. “Financial System is a set of complex and closely inter-mixed financial institutions, markets, instruments, services, practices, procedures and so on.” An economy's financial system exists to organize the settlement of payments, to raise and allocate finance, and to manage the risks associated with financing and exchange. A developed financial system is one that has a secure and efficient payment system, security markets and financial intermediaries that arrange financing, and derivative markets and financial institutions that provide access to risk management instruments. It does so by transfer of various economic units. Goldsmith, R.W., The Flow of Capital funds in the war Economy, New York, Columbia, 1965, p.28 – designated various economic units into three categories; (i) Savings-surplus units> those units whose savings are in excess of investments, (ii) Economic Units> in whose case the investments exceed their savings referred to as savings-deficit units and (iii) Neutral Units> in whose case savings are......

Words: 1107 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Indian Health Services

...Indian Health Services Program Erika Western Governors University * * * * The Indian Health Service (IHS) was established in 1955 as a federal agency within the Department of Health and Human Service. IHS primary responsibilities include providing health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The goal of IHS is to raise the health status of the Indian population to the highest possible level while providing health services to Indians from 566 Tribes across the United States. The mission of IHS is to raise the physical, mental, social and spiritual health of American Indians and Alaska Natives to the highest level. (“Agency Overview,” n.d.) * In order to support their mission in raising the health status to the highest possible level and to improve and protect the health of every community, the IHS facilities have chosen to participate in accreditation through the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Accreditation through JCAHO provides many positive benefits and outcomes for the IHS. By seeking accreditation through JCAHO, the community and patients in the IHS system are able to recognize that IHS is committed to clinical quality. JCAHO accreditation sets standards on levels of quality assessment and quality improvement activities. JCAHO monitors programs that are in place within the organization and reviews policies and procedures to ensure life-safety standards are being met. The benefits to...

Words: 2432 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Case Indian Health Services

...Running Head: INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE: CREATING A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE 1 Indian Health Service: Creating a Climate for Change Michele Kratter Keiser University Professor Bush HSM692/Strategic Management of Health Services Organization 9/26/2015 Running Head: INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE: CREATING A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE 2 Dr. Michael Trujillo was appointed as a Director of the Indian Health Service. Dr. Trujillo was nominee for the position of Director of National Healthcare program. A member of the Sun Clan in the Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. He became the President, for the national health care program, and the comprehensive healthcare for the American Indians and Alaska Natives for more than 500 federally recognized tribes. He spoke to the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs in 1994. During his confirmation hearing as Director of the Indian Health Service, he told the committee that he understood the remoteness of Neah Bay at the northwest tip of Washington on the Makah reservation, and being a resident of the Dakotas, he understood the geographic challenges for health care in the area of Eagle Butte, Rosebud and Twin Buttes.” (1) In front of the same Committee, he negotiated the......

Words: 1035 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Health System

...in community Agreement with Private firm Processing Technology INDICATOR SUBMITTED BY:- Umesh Pandey ROLL No. - 299 Assignment - 2 Q:-2 Objective tree for “Frequent Bus Accidents”? Safety awareness should begin from childhood Advertisement boards and other items that may obstruct visibility should be removed immediately should be removed immediately Road Safety Day / Road Safety Week should be observed in all Schools every year Strictly follow government Rules and Regulations Frequent Bus Accidents Incentive for traffic Police to reduce the accident Health of vehicles should be strictly enforced Use of Dipper at night Stop Hectic Schedule of bus driver Parking Facilities Ask to the Drivers about accident reasons Awareness to use Public Transport Separate lane for Bullock carts Proper Drainage system at the time of rainy season Modernise roads Conversations is also completely preventable  Restrict wrong overtaking Strict Licensing Procedure Objectives Focal Problem SUBMTTED BY- Umesh Pandey ROLL NO. - 299...

Words: 252 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Navajo Indians and Health

...The Navajo Indians Mind, body and spirit are the foundation of the Navajo community. The Navajo culture is known to be very primitive and reserved. This could cause some complications in the health care field. Their basic lifestyle may lead to several health complications, belief in prayer and evil spirits is prominent, they believe that the role of a physician is to be a partner in their healing, there are several nursing practices that need to be considered when caring for a Navajo patient, and as a nurse it is important to treat these people with respect even if their ways may seems unorthodox. The traditional Navajo Indians have a very primitive lifestyle. This means that they don’t necessarily have the best living conditions and don’t always maintain the best nutritional status. They are known for living off of the land and providing what they can for one another. Poor living conditions and lack of proper nutrition can lead to a multitude of health issues. Traditional Navajo homes are made of timber and mud. They usually heat their homes by fire. During winter or cold weather, the Navajos are at risk for hypothermia. Their diet consists of wild game, goats, wild berries, and other vegetables they grow themselves. So, again, during the wintertime, they may not be able to grow enough food to maintain adequate nutrition. This can result in vitamin, electrolyte, and other deficiencies within their community. One deficiency found in the Navajo culture is that of vitamin D....

Words: 1310 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Indian Financial System

...INDIAN FINANCIAL SYSTEM The economic development of a nation is reflected by the progress of the various economic units, broadly classified into corporate sector, government and household sector. A financial system or financial sector functions as an intermediary and facilitates the flow of funds from the areas of surplus to the deficit. It is a composition of various institutions, markets, regulations and laws, practices, money manager analyst, transactions and claims and liabilities. function of the financial system is the mobilisation of savings, their distribution for industrial investment and stimulating capital formation to accelerate the process of economic growth The features of a financial system are as follows 1. Financial system provides an ideal linkage between depositors and investors, thus encouraging both savings and investments. 2. Financial system facilitates expansion of financial markets over space and time. 3. Financial system promotes efficient allocation of financial resources for socially desirable and economically productive purposes. 4. Financial system influences both the quality and the pace of economic development. The Indian Financial system (financial markets) is broadly divided under two heads: (i) Indian Money Market (ii) Indian Capital Market The Indian money market is the market in which short-term funds are borrowed and lent. The money market does not deal in cash, or money but in bills of exchange, grade bills and......

Words: 1577 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

The Health Status of the American Indian

...The Health Status of the American Indian Bonnie Watkins Grand Canyon University The Health Status of the American Indian The American Indian has long been without adequate healthcare. It was without choice that they were forced trade their land and resources for care and protection offered by the Anglo-Americans ("Barriers," 2016). In 1955 the Indian Health Service was created to provide healthcare to the American Indians. Although the intent was good, this service has lacked the necessary resources to provide proficient care to the American Indian. Unfortunately, little has changed, and the American Indian continues to lack the resources necessary to obtain adequate medical care. Studies show that since the early 1960’s disparity in health status exists between the American Indian and the Anglo American. It consistently documented poorer health, with an increase in diseases such as cardiovascular, diabetes, cancer, and depression. From the report: Invisible Tribes: Urban Indians and Their Health in a Changing World findings were: * 30 percent of American Indians/Alaska Natives adults suffer from depression ("American Indians Urban Needs," 2007). * American Indians/Alaska Natives have higher prevalence of diabetes ("American Indians Urban Needs," 2007). * Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among American Indians and Alaska Natives ("American Indians Urban Needs," 2007). One of the biggest challenges is the inability to access......

Words: 990 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Indian Caste System

...special article caste in the 21st century: From system to elements A M Shah The argument that while caste as a system is more or less dead, individual castes are flourishing is widely accepted. However, the notion of “caste as a system” is derived mainly from studies of the rural rather than the urban community. In this article, individual caste is seen in the context of both rural and urban communities and its several aspects, particularly the rule of endogamy as its defining criterion, are analysed at some length and some implications of the analysis are pointed out. n 1955, M N Srinivas presented a paper, ‘Castes: Can They Exist in the India of Tomorrow?’, at a national seminar on “Casteism and Removal of Untouchabilty” in Delhi, attended, among others, by such distinguished persons as S Radhakrishnan, Jagjivan Ram, Govind Ballabh Pant, V K R V Rao, Kaka Kalelkar and Irawati Karve. The paper was published in the seminar report as well as in the Economic Weekly (1955). After a lifetime of scholarship on caste, in 1999, the last year of his life, Srinivas delivered a lecture under different titles in Bangalore, Delhi and Kolkata, on the passing away of caste as a system. It was published posthumously in 2003 in the Economic and Political Weekly under the title, ‘An Obituary on Caste as a System’. Srinivas expanded this title into a sentence, “While caste as a system is dead, individual castes are flourishing” (ibid: 459). He made this statement almost at the end of...

Words: 9036 - Pages: 37

Premium Essay

Indian Health Services

...Indian Health Services System Overview of Indian Health Service The Indian Health Service (IHS), a federal health system, cares for 2 million of the country's 5.2 million American Indian and Alaska Native people. This system has increasingly focused on innovative uses of health information technology and telemedicine, as well as comprehensive, locally tailored prevention and disease management programs, to promote health equity in a population facing multiple health disparities. Important recent achievements include a reduction in the life-expectancy gap between American Indian and Alaska Native people and whites (from eight years to five years) and improved measures of diabetes control (including 20 percent and 10 percent reductions in the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hemoglobin A1C, respectively). However, disparities persist between American Indian and Alaska Native people and the overall US population. Continued innovation and increased funding are required to further improve health and achieve equity (Trujillo, 2002). In the 2010 census, 5.2 million people identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native, representing 1.7 percent of the US population. American Indian and Alaska Native people experience poor health outcomes and have an average life expectancy that is more than five years shorter than that of the overall US population. The causes of this disparity span the life spectrum, beginning with high infant mortality rates, and......

Words: 4324 - Pages: 18