Psychology Applied to Law

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By kamickadm
Words 303
Pages 2
The culture of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is in contrast to its mission that says “to serve, protect and reassure with courtesy, integrity and proper respect for the rights of all.” The JCF has been described as internalistic, change resistant, low trust, process oriented, fear-based and repressive, little community focus, and highly segmented. There is evidence of a subculture within the JCF which has led to certain groups of people receiving different treatment than others. This in-group/out-group effect can be very powerful and overtime has become harmful to the integrity and effectiveness of the JCF. The creation of ‘special units’ to address issues has created a closed elitist culture. A “them’ and “us culture exists between the police and the public, with the two groups not being able to integrate. This has led to stereotyping, prejudice, and perceptions of superiority/inferiority. The police has sought to impose its authority over the public; expecting unopposed obedience. The solution for cultural transformation lies in transformational leadership in the JCF hierarchy, which will induce members to identify more closely with the organization, boost morale, and productivity and build partnerships with the community. Socialization is an important solution as police officers tend to become the police officers they are socialized to be. The two most important components of the socialization process are formal training and informal “peer group” instruction of young officers. It is the role of leadership to refine this socialization. The preface to this is a vigorous selection of recruits. What is also required is that there is a clear indication of a positive shift from the old attitude, beliefs and processes within the JCF to a new organization, with new management and leadership. This can be achieved via a name change from JCF to…...

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