Sony Case Study

In: Business and Management

Submitted By tcgallo
Words 2429
Pages 10
GBA490 Sony Case Study
18 October 2012

Table of Contents

Appendix
Exhibit 1………………………………………………………………..3
Exhibit 2………………………………………………………………..8
Exhibit 3………………………………………………………………..9
Exhibit 4………………………………………………………………..10
Exhibit 5………………………………………………………………..11
Exhibit 6………………………………………………………………..12
Exhibit 7………………………………………………………………..12
Exhibit 8………………………………………………………………..13
Exhibit 9………………………………………………………………..13
Exhibit 10………………………………………………………………14
Exhibit 11………………………………………………………………14

Exhibit 1: Dominant Economic Features Market Size and Growth Rate

Record Label Market Size: * Total revenues for the music industry in 2011 was 7.4 billion dollars * Sony accounted for 27.6% of total market share * There were 231 businesses in this industry in 2011 * Regulation was heavy, the change in technology was high--causing revenue volatility--the barriers to entry were high, and competition was high. * See Photo:

Market Growth Rate * Total Album Sales- Sony was second highest with 29.29% of the market share, behind the leader Universal by a slim 0.56% * Sony was still the leading holder of market share in physical album sales at 31.08% * In digital sales, Sony was still behind Universal by 2.99% and 6.76% in album sales and individual track sales, respectively. * Record labels as a whole were in decline * Regulation was high, as was change in technology * Internet was making it easier and easier for the artists to cut out the middleman * See Photo:

Publishing Market Size: * Revenues totaled 4.9 billion dollars * Sony was the 4th largest in the industry with 7.7% of the market share * There were 1,528 businesses in the industry * Regulation was heavy, change in technology was medium, barriers to entry…...

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