Starbucks as an International Business

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Running head: STARBUCKS AS AN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

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An Analysis of Starbucks as a Company and an International Business

Lauren Roby

A Senior Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation in the Honors Program Liberty University Spring 2011

STARBUCKS AS AN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Acceptance of Senior Honors Thesis This Senior Honors Thesis is accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation from the Honors Program of Liberty University.

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______________________________ Edward M. Moore, Ph.D. Thesis Chair

______________________________ Melanie A. Hicks, D.B.A. Committee Member

______________________________ Harvey D. Hartman, Th.D. Committee Member

______________________________ James H. Nutter, D.A. Honors Director

______________________________ Date

STARBUCKS AS AN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Abstract The researcher examines a detailed synopsis of the specialty coffee industry and the role that Starbucks plays in it. Starbucks is in a growth market, and it has a good relative

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overall position. The researcher will examine the business structure of Starbucks and the future implications of its current business strategies. By examining the strategic imperatives such as how to expand abroad and understanding the international context, the researcher will determine strong and weak business strategies of the company. Starbucks has overcome organizational and managerial implications that will serve as a strong model for international businesses. The researcher will then give strategy and implementation recommendations on how Starbucks can grow as an international business.

STARBUCKS AS AN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS An Analysis of Starbucks as a Company and an International Business Introduction Millions of people all over the world walk into Starbucks every day for their cup of coffee,…...

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