Syllabus for Media

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| Course Syllabus College of Humanities HUM/186 Version 3 Media Influences on American Culture WCFYS0712 | Copyright © 2012, 2011, 2009 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. Course Start Date: Tuesday, 8/28/2012 Week 2: Tuesday, 9/4/2012 Week 3: Tuesday, 9/11/2012 Week 4: Tuesday, 9/18/2012 Week 5: Tuesday, 9/25/2012 Course End Date: Tuesday, 9/25/2012 Facilitator Information Ststeve Headley sheadley@email.phoenix.edu (University of Phoenix faculty)
Steve.Headley@phoenix.edu (work)
727-642-4993 (cell) 513-551-5144 (Work)
Course Description

The course provides an introduction to the most prominent forms of media that influence and impact social, business, political, and popular culture in contemporary America. It explores the unique aspects of each medium as well as interactions across various media that combine to create rich environments for information sharing, entertainment, business, and social interaction in the United States and around the world.

Policies
Faculty and students/learners will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents:

University policies: You must be logged into the student website to view this document.
Instructor policies: This document is posted in the Course Materials forum.

University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class. Policies may be slightly different depending on the modality in which you attend class. If you have recently changed modalities, read the policies governing your current class modality.

Course Materials
Campbell, R., Martin, C. R., & Fabos, B (2012). Media & culture: An introduction to mass…...

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