Tesl

In: English and Literature

Submitted By emily6656
Words 1620
Pages 7
Emily Nickell
LING 4460
Gender and the Language Strategies: Looking Beyond the Categories
April 9, 2014

Abstract Indika Liyanage and Brendan John Bartlett’s article Gender and Language Learning Strategies challenges the previously held assumptions between gender and Language Learning Strategies (LLS). This article found that past research studies have supported an association between genders, with their findings concluding that females have a stronger predilection for LLS than males do. Liyanage and Bartlett go on to conduct a study with Sri-Lankan learners of ESL in five different learning context: speaking in class, listening in class, listening and speaking outside of class, reading in class and writing in class; to further explore the generalities associated with gender and LLS. The study concluded that preferences for individual strategies did not necessarily correlate with gender, unlike with broadly categorized strategies (cognitive, metacognitive, or affective). However, it did determine that certain strategies were clearly preferred by males while others were clearly preferred by females depending on the learning context in which these strategies were being implemented. This articles begins by drawing on two previous studies that concern both first language (L1) learning (Martino 1995; Masters and Forster 1997; Teese et al. 1995) and second language (L2) learning (Bacon and Finneman 1992; Ehrman and Oxford 1988; Politzer 1983). These studies support an association between gender and LLS, the authors believe that these studies are based in generalizations and only end up supporting the association of LLS and gender on a “superficial level.” Some of the bias and issues surrounding LLS and gender are explored in this article are; female superiority in L1 learners, inconclusive or varying results that suggest that males tend to surpass females in…...

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