Premium Essay

The Deadliest Disease in the World

In: Science

Submitted By sean44sheldon
Words 832
Pages 4
Sean Sheldon
Professor Keiter
SCIN132
9/20/15
The Deadliest Disease in the World

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most deadly disease in the world. CAD occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries causing blood clots and restricting the heart of oxygen. CAD is the number one cause of death in the United States and the world. Medications and treatments are available but nothing can take the place of being proactive and preventing the disease. ("What Is Coronary Heart Disease?")
Coronary artery disease is caused when cholesterol containing deposits of plaque buildup inside the arteries that supply blood to your heart. As the plaque builds up, it begins to narrow your arteries, decreasing the amount of blood flow to your heart. The plaque often attracts other fibrous tissue such as calcium and blood components which further harden the artery by causing blood clots to form. Over time, the decreased blood flow will cause shortness of breath, chest pain and even heart attack. ("What Is Coronary Heart Disease?")
According to the center of disease control, heart disease is the number 1 cause of death in the United States, killing over 780,000 people every year. Specifically, coronary artery disease is responsible for killing over 380,000 people per year. ("Heart Disease: Scope and Impact") Cardiovascular disease takes more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Furthermore, someone will have a heart attack every 34 seconds in the United States, and every 60 seconds someone will die from a heart related disease. Research shows that in 2011 326,000 people had a heart attack outside of a hospital setting, of those eventually treated by emergency services only 10.6% survived. ("Heart Disease: Scope and Impact")
The system most directly affected by CAD is obviously the heart, however atherosclerosis can occur in different blood vessels throughout the body. This…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Disease

...Questions: Diseases of poverty and the 10/90 Gap. 1. What is the 10/90 gap? This is where 10 per cent of global health research is devoted to conditions that account for 90 per cent of the global disease burden. 2. What are neglected diseases according to this paper? Neglected diseases are diseases such as Leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, Chagas’disease, leprosy, Guinea worm, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. 3. According to figure one how many people a year die from childhood disease and diarrheal diseases? Over 9,000 people 4. Can illnesses in third world countries be treated OR avoided? Refer to a specific example. Yes, illnesses can be treated and even prevented form occurring in the first place. The disease include, but are not limited to, tuberculosis, malaria and various childhood diseases. Tuberculosis can be treated/prevented by improving nutrition and can be treated by DOTS therapy. Malaria can aslo be treated or prevented by using insecticide, spraying homes with DDT and using mosquito nets and medicines. Childhood diseases are preventable by the child being vaccinated at a young age. 5. Give an example of a disease for which there is no treatment. Dengue Fever 6. Do non-communicable diseases not occur in low-income countries? No, these diseases have started to occur in low-income countries 7. Are there obese people in lower income countries? Give two specific pieces of evidence to support your answer. Yes. 50% of......

Words: 421 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Infectious Diseases: the Greatest Crisis of the World

...Infectious Diseases: The Greatest Crisis of the world ____________ A Thesis Presented to The Division of The Arts and Sciences Voorhees College ____________ In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Bachelor of Science ____________ Acknowledgements I am whole-heartily thankful to my Professors at Voorhees College for their tremendous effort in my maturilication through Voorhees College. Lastly I would like to acknowledge all of the people who had any hand in the completion of this thesis. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION * What are infectious Diseases? * Types of infectious diseases * Worldwide distribution of infectious diseases * * CHAPTER 2: THE LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH IS THE WORLD * Top Countries * Top Diseases * CHAPTER 3: MOST DISEASES ARE PREVENTABLE * Why are statistics so high * Minorities prevalence, morbidity, and mortality * How to prevent yourself from being a statistic * Understanding the emotional burden brought upon families who suffer from infectious Diseases * * CHAPTER 4: TRANSMISSION OF DISEASE: COUNTRY TO COUNTRY * Thorough testing while entering and exiting countries * Childhood and adult Immunizations * * CHAPTER 5: FOOD BOURNE PATHOGES * How do they affect......

Words: 1544 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Disease

...Dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease): eradication without a drug or a vaccine, Gautam Biswas, Dieudonne P. Sankara, Junerlyn Agua-Agum and Alhousseine Maiga, June 2013. Introduction: Dracunculiasis is the first parasitic disease that has the potential to be eradicated without the need of drugs or vaccines. Since the parasite life cycle revolves around the host consuming the infected copepod in the water, the experimental designed was to focus on the introduction of water treatment educations into those tropical and subtropical areas. Design and Strategies: The eradication campaigns were also supported by many private and community partnership, and the strategy was to surveillance, provision of safe drinking water, vector control, health education and certification of eradication. In summary, every case should be monitored and recorded before, during and after the launch of the programs. Water sources should be well treated and maintained to control the only mode of transmission through copepods, and proper disposed of water education should be taught to the people. Lastly, the disease must be certified by WHO for every epidemic countries to mark the complete termination of Dracunculiasis. Result: The progress was recorded. In 1986, there were an estimated of 3.5 million cases of Dracunculiasis. After the launch of the studies, in 1989, a total of 883,640 cases were reported to WHO by 15 countries, and in 2004, those countries has been reduced to only 12 endemic......

Words: 644 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Silent Words Are the Deadliest

...John Noel Professor Tillman Communication Speech 100 16 October 2013 The Silent Words are the Deadliest The ideal relationship between two people includes trust, similar interests, love, care, but most importantly, good communication. There are three models of communication that are simplified chunks of how communication can be used between two people. The first is human communication as an action, which is clearly defined as a message sent from one person and received to another with no reaction. The second model is human communications as an interaction. This situation is more of a transaction as one person gives a comment or question and then the second person retorts with an answer. This is an effective method if one quickly needs simple information, such as “Did you get milk at the store, Mom?” and she might reply, “No”. The third, and most optimal choice of communication is called human communication as a translation. This type of interaction between two people is simultaneous and has common meaning of feelings and ideas. A common example is when college students bouncing ideas back and forth off each other in class during a large group discussion. A recent experience of miscommunication made me think about how efficient communication was. Recently, my friend just turned 21. We were going to have a great time, but I realized I had a test the next morning. I could not celebrate with him if I wanted to do well on my exam the next day, but I did not want him to......

Words: 574 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Race: the World's Deadliest Social Disease

...The journal article I chose, Race: The World’s Deadliest Social Disease by Timothy McGettigan, discusses racism in our society and how this ‘socially-constructed disease’ is due to a specific type of ignorance. The article goes into details on how racism can be avoided if people were more educated on science. This argument is then supported throughout the article with specific details and information on how humans are all essentially the same and that if certain people hate others due to their genetic attributes then, technically, they hate themselves as well. Furthermore, the article explains how genetic diversity is adaptively advantageous since there is a greater chance of a species to be plagued by parasites if they are too genetically similar. The wider the variation in the gene pool, the more difficult it is for parasites and other undesirable invaders to interfere. I think this article not only relates to me but to everyone since we all live in a society with lots of diversity. Diversity is not something that we can escape and I think it’s important to know how to handle it. This article is very informative about what causes diversity to emerge among humans and how we should not be afraid of it or discriminate towards those who not look like us. At the end of the day, diversity is only beneficial to the human race. Also, I can relate to this article since I come from a different country so I have been exposed to a great amount of diversity in my life. This eye......

Words: 348 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Disease

...Concerning disease, research papers report that the medical field believes that disease is the result of physical changes within the body. This philosophy of science has led to a narrow focus upon pathogens that create illness. Modern medicine looks to biochemical factors, levels of immunology, nutrition, and environmental toxins as causing disease. To eradicate disease or illness, then these elements thought to cause the difficulties must some how be changed. There are several implications of this treatment of disease. One is that given the sophistication of causality and treatment, the medicine man or physician must be well trained in the complexities of this field. Another is that equally sophisticated or technologically advanced tools must be created or developed to ascertain the precise disease in order to prescribe the precise treatment that is necessary to affect a cure. Still another implication is that the medicine must be specific in order to attack and kill whatever it is causing the illness. Modern medicine appears to have met the challenge of these implications with regard to developing treatments that will cure most diseases. Interestingly, the diseases that continue to plague modern medicine are diseases that did not exist in the pre-European world of Native Americans. Heart disease and cancer, the two illnesses that are fatal and impact contemporary Americans, continue to sometimes have fatal consequences. Below is a list of some of the most common......

Words: 260 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Ebola Virus Disease

...Ebola virus disease Key facts * Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans. * The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. * The average EVD case fatality rate is around 50%. Case fatality rates have varied from 25% to 90% in past outbreaks. * The first EVD outbreaks occurred in remote villages in Central Africa, near tropical rainforests, but the most recent outbreak in west Africa has involved major urban as well as rural areas. * Community engagement is key to successfully controlling outbreaks. Good outbreak control relies on applying a package of interventions, namely case management, surveillance and contact tracing, a good laboratory service, safe burials and social mobilisation. * Early supportive care with rehydration, symptomatic treatment improves survival. There is as yet no licensed treatment proven to neutralise the virus but a range of blood, immunological and drug therapies are under development. * There are currently no licensed Ebola vaccines but 2 potential candidates are undergoing evaluation. Background The Ebola virus causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreated. Ebola virus disease (EVD) first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village......

Words: 2440 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

The Deadliest War in the World

... The Deadliest War in the World Roy A. Richards Union Institute & University October, 2008 The Deadliest War in the World In this article, I will discuss the battle in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the struggle that thousands of people face as they battle the government for natural resources. This article will show how this country is affected by famine, rape, and murder and what steps the government is taking to eliminate these problems. The Democratic Republic of Congo is the third largest country in Africa and is located in the Central African UN subregion. The word “Congo” means “hunter” and was named after the Bakongo ethnic group who live in the Congo River basin. Following the country’s post-independence the former Belgian Congo was changed to The Democratic Republic of Congo on August 1, 1964 to distinguish it from the Republic of Congo. In 1960 General Joseph Motubu came into power, changed his name to Motubu Sese Seko, and changed the country’s name to the Republic of Zaire. 1997 was the year rebel forces (backed by Laurent Kabila) changed the country’s name back to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and this change cased a new rebellion between him and former allies in 1998, and so began “Africa’s World War”...

Words: 1795 - Pages: 8

Free Essay

Diseases

...GLOBAL VARIATIONS OF CHRONIC DISEASE Name: Institution: Chronic diseases all around the world have been causing lots deaths and having devastating effects on families (CDC, 2011). In this essay, I will discuss coronary heart disease symptoms, detection, prevention, causal mechanisms, treatment, and effects. I will also analyze its global variations and recommend how public health officers can be able to promote prevention and treatment measures. Coronary heart disease is a disease that develops over a long time. This disease involves accumulation or deposition of plaque in the coronary arteries that supply the heart muscles with oxygen and nourishments. The plaque hardens with time and it can burst at time and formation of a clot can occur in the artery causing more narrowing or blockage. In the long run, the accumulation leads to a decrease of the coronary artery diameter. This causes limitation of the oxygen and other nourishments supplied to the heart muscles. This weakens the heart muscles hence impairing the function of the heart resulting to angina, myocardial infarction, heart attack/heart failure and finally death (Krasner & Riegelman, 2013). A coronary heart disease has several causes or factors that are affiliated to it. These factors are classified into modifiable and non-modifiable depending on whether they can be prevented or not. Some of the modifiable factors are: smoking...

Words: 1534 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

World Covered by Smoke and Disease

...To find why smoking in public places is still not banned in every country in the world, I found many arguments on this topic. There are a huge number of articles, journals and arguments exist, but they lack sufficient judgement to support the cause. For the last few years, some researchers have been trying to indicate the advantages of smoking by their research. This paper describes the information that might have been felt much, but ignored. I have tried to link them with existing knowledge about the problem and give it a new shape, and it may give a significant degree of speed to the voice. This paper is organized in a short form of the effort, describing a summarized view of the cause and argument. WHY SMOKING SHOULD BE BANNED? By not smoking, a person can save as much as money to meet other costly necessities. In third world countries, it is seen that one can save as much money to run his whole family’s educational costs. The whole world can save enough money in one month from smoking to eliminate hunger from the world. There will be 8-10% more food. According to (Chapman), the world can save 65% accidental fire breakouts every year throughout the world. A huge portion of the greenhouse effect could be reduced. Millions of hectoring of lands would become more fertile and grow more food. Millions of square feet of papers will be saved and thus can help the underprivileged children with their education....

Words: 252 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Disease

...What is Health? Stated by The World Health Organization (April 7th, 1948) as being a vital conditional function in mental or social wellbeing- physical, absence of infirmities and diseases along with being characterized as an everyday life, positive concepts and spirit.  Even though all the definition are very explanatory the overall meaning using it depends on all the different cultures, countries, ethnicities and religion, back ground all these aspects deal with all kinds of different outlook in the definition/constitution of their values when it comes to the global statue in health, wellness and healing. (WHO 2006). Understanding that it’s whole ideas has to shape its own demographic which gives the views of defining the wide ranging in physical and mental issues aspect that involves the social well-being, when giving cause to the disease eradication so intel giving a comprehensive aspire approach to all objectives and governance structures for all people this gives the highest support of each level of health in international standards and biological etc. In the cross-disciplinary gives a comprehensive idea of balanced and a detail overview of each complex of arguments, for and against human cloning this is perspective is a timely in anthology that offers an expert opinion from a scientific, religious views in the western and non-western philosophical legal points of views. In saying to me all the major side of the ethical issues that dose surround the controversial......

Words: 444 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Disease

...Disorders and Diseases Affecting the Lymphatic System Brittany Drake ITT Technical Institute Disorders and Diseases Affecting the Lymphatic System Filarises is a parasitic disease that is caused by a worm so tiny it can only be viewed by a microscope. The body’s lymph system is responsible for maintaining the body’s balance of fluid as well as fight infections. Filarises is spread from person to person via mosquito bites. When an infected person with filarises is bitten by a mosquito the circulating worms from inside the infected persons blood enters the mosquito and carried to another person that is bit by the same mosquito. Once the person is bitten by the mosquito the worms travel to the lymph vessels. Once the worms reach the lymph vessels they mature into adults and live for five to seven years. Repeat mosquito bites over several months are needed to get filariases. This diseases is most common in tropical or subtropical areas. This infection will show up on a blood test as most that suffer from this disease are asymptomatic. Some people may develop lymphedema. Fluid collection and swelling is a result of the improper functioning of the lymph system. Usually this takes place in the legs however the genitalia, arms and breasts can be affected as well. People affected with this disease will have more bacterial infections in the skin as well as the lymph system. Hardening and thickening of the skin develops. This is known as elephantiasis. Men can develop......

Words: 1241 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Disease & Evolution

...Disease and Evolution The human body has been plagued with diseases since the beginning of time—pathogens like viruses and bacteria have made us privy to Mother Nature. As humans evolve, so do the diseases we are susceptible to. Some diseases that were once rare have become common, others have disappeared and newer, more daunting ones have emerged. Many of these changes have taken place in the wake of important transformations in human civilizations and ecology. It is therefore feasible to propose that diseases succeed and fail in response to humanity's advances. Natural selection is unable to provide us with perfect protection against all pathogens, because they tend to evolve much faster than humans do. E. coli, for example, with its rapid rates of reproduction, has as much opportunity for mutation and selection in one day as humanity gets in a millennium. And our defenses, whether natural or artificial, make for potent selection forces. Pathogens either quickly evolve a counter defense or become extinct. Diseases such as AIDS, Ebola, Polio have shown their wrath and humans have sought to find cures and treatment options. By definition, disease is essentially “a disorder of structure or function that produces specific signs or symptoms or that affect a specific location (not just from a physical injury)” (WHO, 2007). The true boundaries and limitations of disease remain elusive. Healthcare specialists and researchers use “normal” conditions as their basis in order to......

Words: 2793 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Disease in the World

...Culture and Disease: Malaria Jocelyn M. Atkinson HCS/235 September 12, 2011 Windy Tanner Culture and Disease: Malaria There are 300 million cases of malaria globally each year, resulting in more than one million deaths. Ninety percent of the deaths caused by malaria occur in sub-Saharan Africa, and it is the leading cause of death in children under age five. Malaria constitutes as ten percent of the continents overall disease burden. Africa has a tremendous amount of the malaria burden due to the Anophelus genus mosquito. This species of mosquito is the only species that can transmit the disease. Malaria cannot be transferred directly from one person to another. It has to be contracted from the bite of a mosquito. The female Anophelus picks up the parasite from an infected person when she bites to obtain blood needed to foster her eggs. Once inside the mosquito, the parasite develops and reproduces. This parasite needs an incubation period of one week before it can actually be spread. When the mosquito bites another person, the parasite mixes with its saliva and then passes it into the blood stream of the person bitten. Once the parasite has entered the body, it travels to the liver where it can remain dormant for months or years. When in the liver, the parasite can multiply rapidly. The parasite attacks the red blood cells destroying them and obstructing the capillaries that carry blood to the brain and other vital organs. Symptoms......

Words: 916 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Disease

...Meningococcal disease, also known as meningitis, is caused by the bacteria known as Neiserria meningitids, and is one of the leading causes of bacterial meningitis worldwide. Outbreaks of this disease are rare in the United States but are very common along an area of sub –Saharan African called the African Belt. The African Belt stretches from the Senegal in the west to Ethiopia in the east with 26 countries involved where it contains the highest rates of the disease. (Who, 2015). Neiserria meningitids is carried in the throat and is transmitted from person to person through droplets of respiratory or throat secretions from carriers. It is secreted from prolonged kissing, sneezing or coughing on someone or by living in close quarters. There is an incubation period of about 4 days before symptoms start to occur. Symptoms of meningitis include a stiff neck, high fever, confusion, headaches vomiting, and sensitivity to light. Meningococcal disease can be a potentially fatal disease if not treated right away. Patients must have a lumbar puncture performed so that spinal fluid can be examined and antibiotics, such as penicillin and ceftriaxone must be given as soon as possible. Sometimes the infection can be severe enough that death or serious long term problems can occur. About 11 to 19 out of every 100 survivors will have long term disabilities such as loss of limb, deafness nervous system problems or brain damage. (CDC, 2015). Meningococcal......

Words: 1385 - Pages: 6