To What Extent Was Chinese Involvement in the Korean War Merely an Instrument of Stalin’s Foreign Policy Rather Than as a Force for Spreading Communist Revolution?

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Chinese involvement in the Korean War was merely an instrument of Stalin’s foreign policy rather than as a force for spreading communist revolution. How far do you accept this interpretation?
Chinese involvement in the Korean War was largely due to Stalin’s use of manipulation and encouragement towards Mao, convincing him to join the war. To a large extent, Stalin’s motivation behind encouraging Mao to join the war could be due to the possibility of increasing communist influence in Asia. China is a large and, in comparison to other Asian countries, powerful place. With their help, North Korea’s chances of winning the war and therefore increasing communism in Asia was much more likely. The other possibility is that Stalin encouraged China’s involvement due to his foreign policy which meant that communist countries such as China and the USSR should help other communist countries (i.e. North Korea) in disputes whereby Nationalists and Communists are fighting.
The idea of Chinese involvement in the war seems possible, to a small extent, to be due to Stalin’s policy when we look at his involvement in the decision. The military campaign against South Korea was agreed between Stalin and Kim Il-Sung, showing Stalin’s genuine interest in helping North Korea in the dispute. Stalin’s enthusiasm in Chinese involvement also suggests that he was motivated by his foreign policy and helping a fellow communist state as he was aware of China’s power in Asia. He knew that China were much larger and therefore capable of helping North Korea win the war, showing that he just wanted to help protect North Korea from the Nationalist state of South Korea. However, the negotiations seemed to show aggressive tactics into attacking South Korea, showing the war was not defensive on the communist side. The negotiations were kept secret from Mao, too, suggesting that Stalin’s claims that…...

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