United Nations Human Rights Council

In: Social Issues

Submitted By erica1234
Words 1267
Pages 6
The United Nations was established in 1945 after WWII. Its predecessor the League of Nations was seen as a failure when it failed to prevent WWII. United Nations was established by 51 nations “committed to maintaining international peace and security, developing friendly relations among nations and promoting social progress, better living standards and human rights”.1 At present time there are 193 member of the United Nations.
After the tragedy of the holocaust the international community banded together to ensure that such a tragedy would never happen again. (???) In 1948 the United Nations established the “Universal Declatarion of Human Rights”. 2 The UDHR states that “out basic civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights that all human beings should enjoy” 3 The United Nations describes human rights as “ rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status”. 4 Since 1948 there have been other treaties and laws that have been established to further define human rights and deal with human rights issues. In 2006 the Human Rights Council was established. The council is a “intergovernmental body” comprised of 47 members. Acccording to the council, members can serve on the commission for a period of 3 years, with a miaximum of two (2) consecutive terms. The councils prime responsibility is the “promotion and protection of human rights around the globe and for addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them” 5 The 47 seats are divided in to “equitable geographical” 6 areas. These areas are as follows: 1. African States: 13 seats 2. Asian States: 13 seats 3. Latin American and Caribbean States: 8 seats 4. Western European and other States: 7 seats 5. Eastern European States: 6 seats…...

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