Voyage Essay

In: Historical Events

Submitted By caatkd
Words 761
Pages 4
In the book “A Voyage Long and Strange” the author goes into many different stories as to why the history that many children and even adults are taught is either mostly made up or, in some cases, a complete fabrication. Three of the many misconceptions that he goes in to are: that Columbus was the first to reach North America, that Plymouth Rock was the where the first “pilgrims” landed, and that Jamestown was the first English Colony in the new world. Another main point that he wants to get across is that, in his research around the country, he found that the myths or legends were more important to the people than what actually happened.
The common idea of the first european to set foot on North America is that it was Columbus. This is far from the truth. The group that holds that title are the Vikings. They arrived in what is modern day “Newfoundland”. They also arrived half a millenium before any other europeans reached North America. Now, the settlement wasn’t a beacon of its time as it was just a farm settlement but, it was there long before Columbus’s great grandparents were even alive. The reason why American’s choose not to acknowledge this or flat out do not know about this is likely due to the fact that the Vikings didn’t land in modern day “USA”. The fantasy that Plymouth rock was where the first english settlers landed and that thanksgiving was eaten on it and all the indians were invited and that it was all perfect is just that, a fantasy. First of all, Roanoke was the first english settlement. Second, the Indians were not invited to Thanksgiving. The reason why the myth of Plymouth is so perpetuated throughout American history is because, as the author is told, “No one wants to build a national story around a man killing and eating his pregnant wife, or colonists too lazy to grow their own food.”. That was in reference to what happened in Jamestown…...

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