What Is It About Theories in the Human Sciences and Natural Sciences That Makes Them Convincing?

In: Other Topics

Submitted By challisnick
Words 721
Pages 3
Over the past thousands of years natural science has been the focal point of scientific research, drawing in the world’s greatest minds as they attempt to solve the most puzzling and intriguing of questions. One such mind is Newton, who’s simple observations of an apple falling from a tree led to the recognition of one of the most remarkable scientific breakthroughs of our millennium, gravity. However, another field of science has emerged in recent times, the field of the humanistic sciences. While natural sciences concentrate on chemistry, physics, and biology, human sciences surround history, economics, anthropology, and psychology. However, as these fields attempt to answer age-old questions concerning human behaviour, and the laws of the world, it is easy to wonder to what extent we can accept their discoveries as fact. Furthermore, what causes these scientific fields to be so intuitively appealing? Finally, as the majority of research performed in both fields relies on observation, to what extent can we trust observations utilizing sense perception? And what are the limitations of this trust in our human sense perception? Despite these several questions, the natural sciences serves a significantly more convincing field than human sciences, as more scientific research can be validated and accepted as truth. Furthermore, the human sciences relies almost solely off perception of past events, or behaviour, which can be contorted by bias, as well as several other limiting factors.

One of the most intuitively appealing aspects of natural sciences is that they simply study our observable world. Much of the study of natural sciences revolves around observations of reactions, processes, and natural occurrences. However, the natural sciences are not limited by their dependence on observation and perception, but use it as a way of supporting their claims and theories.…...

Similar Documents

Natural Science

...biological diversity, climate change, nutritional economics, population growth, water supply, and access to food. In this research paper, the harmful chemicals found in “ instant ” and “ processed “ food will be discuss. This is a brief meaning of the two: Instant food- Our diverse range of instant food items also includes a wide variety of eatables which are healthy as well as nourishing. These instant food items are manufactured in accordance to the standard set by the industry. The packaging of our eatables is done hygienically so that the quality of the food does not get affected. Some of the varieties of our eatables are instant food items, ready to eat and instant food mix. Processed food- Processed foods have been altered from their natural state for safety reasons and for convenience. The methods used for processing foods include canning, freezing, refrigeration, dehydration and aseptic processing. We tend to think of processed foods as bad, but it turns out that some processed foods are not bad for your health at all....

Words: 342 - Pages: 2

What Are the Main Motivation Theories and How Could Science of Delight Replace Them?

...There are many different motivation theories that are used day to day in the running of many businesses. The two main ones are Taylor Maslow (‘hierarchy of needs’) and Hertzberg (two factor theory) Maslow’s theory is about how everyone has a ‘hierarchy of needs’ which is that everyone has similar types of needs, which can be sorted into a hierarchy. There are five main categories physiological needs (food, clothes, accommodation), safety (security from danger, safe working conditions), social (need to make friends and feel like you belong somewhere), esteem (having respect for others and self respect) and self-actualisation (achieving ones potential through actions and achievements). Maslow believed that if these were achieved then the maximum potential of the employee can be seen. Science of delight could easily replace this theory as one of the main issues on the hierarchy of needs is self-actualisation. Science of delight is all about how if employees know what the customer wants and needs it can empower them to do be more efficient in the work place. As Maslow states ‘A healthy man is primarily motivated by his needs to develop and actualize his fullest potentialities and capacities’; this directly links to science of delight, so can science of delight thus replace this theory, if in a way it is already included in it. To prove science of delight has the ability to replace Maslow’s theory, stronger evidence that the concept works would emphasise to the employees......

Words: 558 - Pages: 3

What Is a Real Science

...Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and behavior. It uses the scientific method to address the fundamental questions about the human mind and behavior (Schacter, D. L., Gilbert, D. T., & Wegner, D. M. 2). However, in recent years there has been controversy as to whether psychology constitutes as a real science. What is science? One can define science as the knowledge or study of the natural world based on facts learned through experiments and observations (Merriam-Webster). Psychology uses experiments and observations to analyze data and statistics to form hypothesis and predictions. People can benefit from psychology because, without it, people would not understand the problems of child abuse, autism, and mental disorders, which has an impact on society. However, in an article by Alex B. Berezow, he argued that psychology is not a science because “it doesn’t meet the five basic requirements for a field to be considered scientifically rigorous: clearly defined terminology, quantifiability, highly controlled experimental conditions, reproducibility and, finally, predictability and testability” ("Why Psychology isn’t Science"). Psychology is a science because it employs the scientific method to analyze the human mind and behavior and correlates it to the function of society. The components of the scientific method are theories, hypothesizes, predictions, experiments, and results. Psychologists make observations about the function of society, which uses the......

Words: 377 - Pages: 2

Natural Science

...Greek oikos, meaning “household,” combined with the root logy, meaning “the study of.” • literally the study of households including the plants, animals, microbes, and people that live together as interdependent beings on Spaceship Earth. 2/13/2014 7 Ecological Concepts Introduction to Natural Sciences Ecology has been defined by the Ecological Society of America (1993) as: The Four Laws of Ecology 1. Everything is connected to everything else. 2. Everything must go somewhere. 3. Nature knows best. 4. There is no such thing as a free lunch. • The scientific discipline that is concerned with the relationships between organisms and their past, present, and future environments. • These relationships include physiological responses of individuals, structure and dynamics of populations, interactions among species, organization of biological communities, and processing of energy and matter in ecosystems 2/13/2014 8 2/13/2014 10 Nature consists of a number of systems called “spheres”: • • • • • The atmosphere (air and what is in it) The hydrosphere (water in its liquid form) The lithosphere (land, rocks and below) The biosphere (all the living organisms) The anthroposphere (human system) Anthroposphere • The built environment (buildings, roads, and other infrastructure) • Agriculture (also called the Primary Sector) • The manufacturing industry (also called the Secondary Sector) • The service industry (also called the Tertiary Sector) • Energy......

Words: 1575 - Pages: 7

Natural Science

...1. What are the elements that compose the Earth and give the percentage composition of each? The earth as a whole consists of the following elements and percentages: * * Iron – 32% * Oxygen – 30% * Silicon – 15% * Magnesium – 14% * Sulfur – 3% * Nickel – 2% * Calcium – 2% * Aluminium – 1% * Sodium – 3 (percent by weight) * Potassium – 2.5 (percent by weight) 2. What is mineral? Describe the six physical and two chemical properties used to identify minerals. Minerals are substances formed naturally in the Earth.  They have a definite chemical composition and structure. Physical: The physical characteristics of minerals include traits that are use to identify and describe mineral species. * Cleavage is tendency of a crystalline mineral to break in certain directions yielding more or less smooth planar surfaces. These planes of lowest bond energy have minimum value of cohesion. An amorphous body of course has no cleavage. * Parting is obtained when the mineral is subjected to external force. The mineral breaks along planes of structural weakness. The weakness may result from pressure and twinning. Parting resembles cleavage. * Hardness. It is mineral's "scratchability". It is related to the attraction force between atoms. The degree of hardness is determined by observing comparatively the relative ease or difficulty with which one mineral is scratched by another, or by a finger nail, file or knife. *......

Words: 2114 - Pages: 9

Theory of Caring Science

...Theory of Caring Science - - The nursing theory is essentially a set of beliefs, ideas, thought, and hypotheses that are influenced from former nursing representations that have a structured view of the purposes of nursing attempting to explain the correlation of each concept with predictability. (personal experience with nursing theory). This paper will address the core elements of Dr. Jean Watson’s theory of caring science. We will scrutinize the essential key concepts of the theory and its relationship with the other elements, emphasize its effects in a clinical situation, and how it views the nursing policies with definite personal examples. Nursing theories and having knowledge of the theories are important to any nurse. They serve as guides as to how a nurse should treat patients mentally and psychologically, aside from the structured education system a nurse goes through typically. Nursing theories predict and try to explain phenomenon that relates to nursing, giving nurses the necessary mindset to deal with clinical situations that are sometimes out of educational premises. It also provides them insight on what direction to take with their profession, if they pursue such a thing. It strengthens ideas that nurses already know, and encourages them to seek out knowledge of what they need to know. Most importantly, nursing theories also effectively enforce implied rules of professional boundaries between the nurses and their patients. The theory of caring science......

Words: 1524 - Pages: 7

In What Ways May Disagreement Aid the Pursuit of Knowledge in the Natural and Human Sciences?

...never fight over their disagreements. They argue about evidence or go out and seek new evidence.” This quote captures the essence of what this essay is going to cover. Disagreement opens room for questioning and reasoning.. In order to make the knowledge question that entitles this essay easier to understand, the “pursuit of knowledge” needs to be defined. The pursuit of knowledge is a famous term to define the inherent concept of humanity’s constant desire to know more. Personally this topic appeals to me as I have seen the substantial curiosity that children possess, but I believe this thirst for knowledge is very limited. All children want to hear is an answer, but they don’t question the sources or ask to see the evidence. When I noticed this trait in young children, I had an epiphany that if our global society followed this childish outlook on the world, the world and the education system wouldn’t be the same. I will elaborate upon two possible perspectives towards this question; either you believe that disagreement does aid the pursuit of knowledge or you believe that it doesn’t. I will demonstrate both perspectives by analyzing how the roles of logic and emotion help gain new knowledge in the sciences. Ideally the role of logic is applied towards the natural sciences, and the human sciences use emotion as a way of knowing. I believe that disagreement in the natural and human sciences opens up the opportunity to question what has been asserted, in order to ameliorate......

Words: 1581 - Pages: 7

Science of Human Action

...The Science of Human Action By L. M. LACHMANN Praxeology meaning - the study of human action and conduct Praxeology is the deductive study of human action based on the fact that humans engage in purposeful behavior, as opposed to reflexive behavior like sneezing and inanimate behavior. According to adherents, with the action axiom as the starting point, it is possible to draw conclusions about human behavior that are both objective and universal. For example, the notion that humans engage in acts of choice implies that they have preferences, and this must be true for anyone who exhibits intentional behavior. The most common use of the term is in connection with the Austrian School of Economics, as established by economist Ludwig von Mises. Catallactics is the praxeological theory of the way the free market system reaches exchange ratios and prices. It aims to analyse all actions based on monetary calculation and trace the formation of prices back to the point where an agent makes his or her choices. It explains prices as they are, rather than as they "should" be. The laws of catallactics are not value judgments, but aim to be exact, objective and of universal validity. It was first used extensively by the Austrian School economist Ludwig von Mises. This is Professor Mises' magnum opus.' It is a magnum opus in every sense of the word. Its majestic sweep embraces almost the whole field of economics and touches, at some point or other, on almost every social issue......

Words: 5934 - Pages: 24

About Science

...Science From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article is about the general term. For other uses, see Science (disambiguation). The scale of the universe mapped to the branches of science and the hierarchy of science.[1] Science[nb 1] is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.[nb 2] In an older and closely related meaning, "science" also refers to this body of knowledge itself, of the type that can be rationally explained and reliably applied. Ever since classical antiquity, science as a type of knowledge has been closely linked to philosophy. In the West during the early modern period the words "science" and "philosophy of nature" were sometimes used interchangeably,[2]:p.3 and until the 19th century natural philosophy (which is today called "natural science") was considered a branch of philosophy.[3] In modern usage "science" most often refers to a way of pursuing knowledge, not only the knowledge itself. In the 17th and 18th centuries scientists increasingly sought to formulate knowledge in terms of laws of nature. Over the course of the 19th century, the word "science" became increasingly associated with the scientific method itself, as a disciplined way to study the natural world, including physics, chemistry, geology and biology. It is in the 19th century also that the term scientist began to be applied to those who sought knowledge and understanding of......

Words: 3516 - Pages: 15

What Is Science

...– Principle of Sciences. WHAT IS SCIENCE? Science, for me is a word that was introduced to me when I was 10, back in class 4. I still remember my first science book and how enthusiastic I was when I brought it home. The very first chapter of the book was ‘Our Universe’; I was so fascinated by those aesthetic pictures of the galaxy, Milky Way and the nine planets that I almost had thought of becoming an astronomer. But, as I grew up, I realised that science was much more than I had thought of. It is not only limited to the incomprehensible galaxies, but, it is present everywhere, even within us. Everything we do involves science. At the age of 16, science for me was a fat textbook, which horrified me day and night. Science for me was white lab coats and microscopes, which I always had fascinated about. It was about numerous theories which are still argued upon. It was about Newton’s equations scribbled on a blackboard. At that age I was looking Science as a topic which took information from the past, to be analysed, processed and experimented in the present to make our future better. And when I was 17, I asked myself what science was, I looked at it as a subject, which I had to part with to pursue my dreams in the corporate world. But no, science is not just that. Science is my mother cooking luscious food; science is in my father’s archaic camera which has captured me as I have become an adolescent from an infant. Science is a way of......

Words: 602 - Pages: 3

What Is Science

...WHAT IS SCIENCE? Why does the apple fall down and does not go up instead? How does a pulley help in drawing water from the well? Why does the clock move in a clockwise direction at specific intervals and not in the anticlockwise direction? What causes the dispersion of white light? What causes the cell division? How does a cocoon metamorphise into a beautiful butterfly? What causes the day and the night? All of these involve some scientific principles or laws, whether the law of gravity, the rotation of the Earth, the principle of refraction of light or any other principle of science. To a student in the 11th grade, Science is a nightmare. To some it is the only way to become an engineer. To others, science is meant to impress parents. But science is in the smallest of things. Science is in the wings of a butterfly that produce an air current that causes a tornado at one end of the earth, more elaborately explained as the string theory. Science is in the way we evolved from monkeys to humans under the title, theory of evolution given by Charles Darwin. Science is in the way an electric current runs through wires or in the way blood runs through our veins. Science is in the way an eagle spreads its wings to fly or in the way airplanes become their aviation companions. It is in the penicillin that saves a thousand lives and the atom bomb that devastates a million. Science dates back to the early men producing the first fire or the Egyptians preparing concoctions to......

Words: 515 - Pages: 3

What Is Science?

...Science to me is everything that surrounds us. It's to discover information about this world we live in, study this information, and use it however we will; a process that has started long, long ago, and will continue in generations to come. Everything in our world that we use somehow or someway was made by science. It started with discovering something new; then study what it can be capable of. See where this new founded information can be fit into use. Science was used to create something new. In this day and age science has taken us to an entirely new place. From better batteries, to faster computers, to better gas mileage, there has just been a huge breakthrough in science. It is both chemistry and physics. In science of chemistry there is discovering elements and using these elements in chemical bonding. For physics, there are already discovered laws, and properties; such discoveries as gravity, motion, force, speed, velocity, acceleration, etc. Science even branches off as far as the universe and its discoveries. Whether the discovery is 200 years old, 100 years old or present, it's science nonetheless. Science is all around us, from the laptops we use to the cars we drive, something had to be discovered and study for us to able to use either. Maybe it was chemical combustion to get the energy from oil so our cars can move, or even some physics to help us understand how much energy we can save if we make something for aerodynamic. Science is to discover information......

Words: 273 - Pages: 2

About Science

...small, triangular bone at the base of the spinal column in humans and some apes, formed of fused vestigial vertebrae. | Arch | Дуга | Доға | a curved symmetrical structure spanning an opening and typically supporting the weight of a bridge, roof, or wall above it. | Thorax | Грудная клетка | Кеуде қуысы | the part of the body of a mammal between the neck and the abdomen, including the cavity enclosed by the ribs, breastbone, and dorsal vertebrae, and containing the chief organs of circulation and respiration; the chest. | Basic | Основной | Негізгі | forming an essential foundation or starting point; fundamental. | Cartilage | Хрящ | Шеміршек | firm, whitish, flexible connective tissue found in various forms in the larynx and respiratory tract, in structures such as the external ear, and in the articulating surfaces of joints. It is more widespread in the infant skeleton, being replaced by bone during growth. | Pelvis | Таз | Жамбас | the large bony structure near the base of the spine to which the hind limbs or legs are attached in humans and many other vertebrates. | Ligament | Связка | Байлам | a short band of tough, flexible, fibrous connective tissue that connects two bones or cartilages or holds together a joint. | Substance | Вещество, субстанция | Зат | a particular kind of matter with uniform properties. | Bone | Кость | Сүйек | any of the pieces of hard, whitish tissue making up the skeleton in humans and other vertebrates. | Skull | Череп | Бас......

Words: 3720 - Pages: 15

Psychology a Social Science or a Natural Science

...Scope of Psychology - Natural Science or Social Science Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Sociology, and Psychology, are amongst the most important sciences on planet Earth. Based on their field of study these branches of science are broadly categorised as Natural and Social sciences. At first glance one can tell that Sociology is categorised as a Social Science and subjects like Physics and Chemistry are categorised under the Physical science category of Natural Sciences, whilst Biology is categorised under the Life Science category of Natural Sciences. To keep this essay as relevant as possible I shall only be focussing on the Life Science division of Natural Sciences. Like Botany and Zoology, Biology studies living organisms such as plants, animals and several microorganisms. On the contrary, being a Social Science, Sociology studies the working, functioning and the behaviour of society as a whole. So what about Psychology? Is it a Social Science or a Life Science. To get a clear idea we must first define Psychology. Psychology is the study of behaviour and mind, embracing all aspects of conscious and unconscious experience as well as thought. To my utter disappointment, simply defining psychology will not resolve our dilemma, but it does give a clear idea of things. Psychology as a science is interested in what people think, what they feel and how they behave, the subject studies everything from the human brain to consciousness, memory and mental health ,whilst......

Words: 623 - Pages: 3

Linguistics and the Human Sciences

...Linguistics and the Human Sciences LHS (print) issn 1742–2906 LHS (online) issn 1743–1662 Article A linguistic analysis of Spanglish: relating language to identity Jason Rothman and Amy Beth Rell Abstract According to the 2000 census, 35.3 million Hispanics live in the United States. This number comprises 12.5% of the overall population rendering the Latino community the largest minority in the United States. The Mexican community is not only the largest Hispanic group but also the fastest growing: from 1990 to 2000, the Mexican population grew 52.9% increasing from 13.5 million to 20.6 million (U.S. Department of Commerce News, 2001). The influx of Mexican immigrants coupled with the expansion of their community within the United States has created an unparalleled situation of language contact. Language is synonymous with identity (cf. Granger, 2004, and works cited within). To the extent that this is true, Spanish is synonymous with being Mexican and by extension, Chicano. With the advent of amnesty programs such as Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), which naturalized millions of Mexican migrants, what was once a temporal migratory population has become increasingly permanent (Durand et al., 1999). In an effort to conserve Mexican traditions and identity, the struggle to preserve the mother tongue while at the same time acculturate to mainstream Americana has resulted in a variant of Spanglish that has received little attention. This paper will examine......

Words: 9495 - Pages: 38