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What Was the Short Term Significance of the New Deal?

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What was the short term significance of the New Deal?
To discuss the short term significance of the New Deal, it is imperative to define significance. Significance is defined by the number of people’s lives affected by an event; therefore the most significant of the short term effects of the New Deal was FDR’s implementation of radical legislative reforms. It led to a number of positive economic and social changes in a very short space of time, which contrasted greatly with the inaction of the previous Hoover regime. This opinion is supported by well-known New Deal historian Anthony Badger, who stated that "When Roosevelt took power on March 4, 1933; many influential Americans doubted the capacity of a democratic government to act decisively enough to save the country".The creation of public work schemes and relief programmes provided Americans with improved social stability giving them the confidence to support their government’s initiatives, thus enabling Roosevelt to restore elements of the pre-depression economy. Agriculture was also supported to create more jobs and allow business to grow again as opposed to declining as it had during the depression. These changes were all reinforced by the modernisation policies brought in by Roosevelt in the ‘100 days’.

Page 1 Word Count: 291
Page 1 Word Count: 291
This cartoon was published in 1933 by the Pittsburgh Press by Harold Talburt. The use of this cartoon of Uncle Sam ‘holding all the Aces’ shows how the new policies of Roosevelt were supported by the electorate, while also showing the confidence the American people had in his leadership in the period of the New Deal. The reliability of this source may not appear to be high due to the satirical nature of the cartoon, but Harold Talburt won the Pulitzer Prize for his cartoons which were published in major American newspapers such as the Washington Daily News.…...

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