When the Paparazzi Go Too Far

In: Social Issues

Submitted By caitlin1727
Words 2492
Pages 10
Caitlin Birch
Dr. Weinstein
English 202
6 October 2012
When the Paparazzi Go Too Far
1. Introduction Everyone who is interested in pop culture and the entertainment industry knows who the paparazzi are. According to Merriam-Webster’s dictionary, the term paparazzi is defined as “a free lance photographer who aggressively pursues celebrities for the purpose of taking candid photographs.” The term actually came from a film from the 1960’s called ‘La Dolce Vita’, directed by Federico Fellini. A character in the film was a news photographer named Paparazzo. Paparazzi target celebrities and public figures that are in the spotlight. In recent years, the paparazzi have taken their job of snapping photos to another extent. They will go to any length to get the shot of a celebrity, even if that means stalking a celebrities’ every move. The media’s intrusive and insistent attention towards celebrities has caused celebrities to lose their privacy. An anti-paparazzi law is the best solution to help celebrities and public figures who entertain us gain their rights and privacy back.
2. Power of the Media Its almost impossible for us not to be under the power by the media. Every event that happens in the world is brought to everyone’s attention faster with the technology that has enhanced our way of receiving media. The media is everywhere we turn and it makes us question how we will be able to control the media so that its a proper influence on our lives.
2.2 Celebrity Infatuation If you go into any store that sells magazines you will find a large selection of magazines that are just devoted to celebrities and gossip. We live in a time where there is a significant difference between the rich and the poor and there are so many of us that want to know the latest on people who live in the spotlight (1). Most people do not think of celebrities of being…...

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