Ww2 Study Vuidd

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World War Two Study Guide

Fascism: a governmental system led by a dictator having complete power, forcibly suppressing opposition and criticism, regimenting all industry,commerce,etc., and emphasizing an aggressive nationalism and often racism. A political movement that employs the principles and methods of fascism, especially the one established by Mussolini in Italy.

Benito Mussolini: Benito Mussolini served as Italy’s 40th Prime Minister from 1922 until 1943. He is considered a central figure in the creation of Fascism and was both an influence on and close ally of Adolf Hitler during World War II. In 1943, Mussolini was replaced as Prime Minister and served as the head of the Italian Social Republic until his execution by Italian partisans in 1945.

Adolf Hitler: Adolf Hitler was the leader of Nazi Germany from 1933 until his suicide in 1945. Hitler was responsible for starting World War II and for killing more than 11 million people during the Holocaust. He was know as the Führer of the Third Reich. As dictator of Germany, Hitler wanted to increase and strengthen the German army as well as expand Germany's territory. Although these things broke the terms of the Versailles Treaty, the treaty that officially ended World War I, other countries allowed him to do so. Since the terms of the Versailles Treaty had been harsh, other countries found it easier to be lenient than risk another bloody European war. When the Nazis attacked Poland World War II began.
Nazism: "Nazi" is an abbreviation for the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), known in English as the German National Socialist Workers Party, as it existed under the control of Adolf Hitler from 1920 until the end of World War II. The party was held together primarily by authoritarianism, militarism, and belief in German ethnic and cultural supremacy. They killed many Jews due to…...

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...Ralph Stinebrickner1 please direct correspondence to Todd R. Stinebrickner Dept. of Economics The Social Science Centre The University of Western Ontario London Ontario Canada n6a 5c2 trstineb@julian.uwo.ca phone 519 679-2111 ext. 5293 fax 519 661-3666 Unique new data from a college with a mandatory work-study program are used to examine the relationship between working during school and academic performance. Particular attention is paid to the importance of biases that are potentially present because the number of hours that are worked is endogenously chosen by the individual. A “naive” OLS regression, which indicates that a positive and statistically significant relationship exists between hours-worked and grade performance, highlights the potential importance of endogeneity bias in this context. Although a fixed effects estimator suggests that working an additional hour has an effect on grades which is quantitatively very close to zero, we suggest that there are likely to exist causes of endogeneity which are not addressed by the fixed effects estimator. Indeed, an instrumental variables approach, which takes advantage of unique institutional details of the work-study program at this school, indicates that working an additional hour has a negative and quantitatively large effect on grade performance at this school. The results suggest that, even if results appear “reasonable,” a researcher should be cautious when drawing policy conclusions about the relationship......

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Causes Ww2

...Causes WW2 Treaty of Versailles: * Peace treaty after WW1 * 28 June 1919 * The treaty was registered by the League of Nations * The League of Nations was established in 1920 after WW1. It should prevent the outbreak of another war * Germany: * Germany saw the treaty as a punishment * Had to give up part of their territories (Rheinland) * Germany had to admit the war guilt for WW1 * Pay preparations cost to France and Britain Rise of fascism: * Fascism is a totalitarian form of government: * Glorifies the state * Has one leader and one party * All aspects of society are controlled by the government * No opposition or protests are tolerated * Propaganda and censorship are widely practiced * Italy: Benito Mussolini (1922) Great depression, unemployment level high * After WW1 many countries had to suffer from unstable European economy * However to boom in the U.S. helped to sustain worldwide trade * 1929 stock market crashed (Great Depression) * Unemployment level rose * Power leaders and government promised success through military buildup and imperialism Japanese Expansionism: * 1931 Japan invaded Manchuria for raw materials * Sino-Japanese war 1937 * 1938 Japan and Soviet war Fascism Vs. Communism * Production is controlled by the government * Media and all other aspects of society are property of the government *...

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Effects of Ww2 on Minorities

...Nikki Perry Period 3 3/20/13 Effects of WW2 on minorities World War II brought about many socio-economic changes into the United States as it opened up new ways for the minorities as well as women to formally become part of the majority American society. For a long time African Americans, Native Americans (Indians), Mexican Americans, and women were treated differently compared to everyone else (white men) and not in a good way. World War II brought about a lot of changes including, more working opportunities and military opportunities for minorities. African Americans, Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and women were allowed to join the military although there were still some segregation and discrimination. African-Americans gained economic independence during WWII because of the job openings throughout the industry. African-American soldiers were welcomed into certain branches of the armed forces in this war, but, like other wars, there was discrimination and segregation. Soldiers still fought in segregated units throughout the war, but there were advances in the number of commissioned officers. Other forms of racism included barring African-Americans from the Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Army Air Corps, and the Navy only allowed African-Americans as mess men. These conditions were not promising, and these policies have been called “Jim Crow military”. Some changes were made with the 1940 Selective Service Training Act which stated that all men between......

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Study

...TermPaperWarehouse.com - Free Term Papers, Essays and Research Documents The Research Paper Factory JoinSearchBrowseSaved Papers Study Habits In: Study Habits Introduction Study habits are the ways that you study - the habits that you have formed during your school years. Study habits can be good ones, or bad ones. Good study habits include being organized, keeping good notes, reading your textbook, listening in class, and working every day. Bad study habits include skipping class, not doing your work, watching TV or playing video games instead of studying, and losing your work. It means you are not distracted by anything, you have a certain place to go where it is quiet everyday where you study and do homework. Basically it means that you are doing the best you can to get the grades you want. It means you are not distracted by anything, you have a certain place to go where it is quiet everyday where you study and do homework. The manner with which you consistently use to study for school or college or even for next day lesson plans if you're a teacher. Study Habit of every student is one of the most important factors that affect his or her understanding regarding a certain subject. It means, if a student possesses poor study habits, she has a greater chance of getting failing grades, if compare to a students who has a good study habit. But “habit” as it was defined from the Introduction to Psychology, means “a learned, or fixed way of behaving to satisfy a......

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Social Impact of Ww2

...their role in the household • Average earnings for women almost doubled from 1938 – 1945 • Over 500,000 women served in the auxiliary branches of the armed forces • Women employed in industry, commerce and the armed forces rose by 50% to 2 ¼ million by 1943 • Overall, 1 ¼ million men and women volunteered in the war by July 1940 • The National Service Act (December 1941) conscripted unmarried women into the Force’s Auxiliary Corps • However, despite the war giving women more money, greater status and independence, it did not bring around equal pay • After WW1 most women gave up their wartime jobs, however after WW2 a much higher percentage of women kept their jobs • Moreover, sexual relationships flourished / increased over the war period Social levelling and breaking down of class barriers • One of the main aspects of WW2 was social mobility • Conscription was introduced in September 1940 (men aged 18 to 41) • By mid 1941, the army, navy and air force had 3 million members • Over a million of these were volunteers • By 1944, the size of the armed forces had risen to 4.5 million • This was in addition to the 500,000 members of the female services • It wasn’t just UK troops, with 1.5 million overseas troops stationed in Britain • The war widened people’s social horizons however there was also an increase in petty crime, broken marriages and ethnic violence • Unemployment, still over 1 million in 1939, fell by 50% during......

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Study

...ARS 100 STUDY GUIDE for QUIZ 2 & EXAM #1 (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4) Questions on the exam are not limited to the content of this study guide. Questions are derived not only from the study guide, but also from lectures, and readings. You should know the definitions and also be able to identify whether they apply to an image listed in the image list. Quiz 2 Focus of Study: What is Art Lecture Visual elements (Chapter 2 & The Visual Elements of Art Lecture) Terms related to color (Chapter 2 & The Visual Elements of Art Lecture) Motion/implied motion (Chapter 2 & The Visual Elements of Art Lecture) Techniques for creating the illusion of three-dimension (Chapter 2 & The Visual Elements of Art Lecture) Techniques for creating the illusion of depth (Chapter 2 & The Visual Elements of Art Lecture) Design principles (Chapter 3 & The Principles of Design Lecture) Exam 1 Focus of Study KEY TERMS: Trompe l’oeil Nonobjective art Representational art Impasto Iconography Chiaroscuro Contrapposto value Linear perspective Emphasis Expressionistic art scale/hierarchical scale Unity & variety Design principles Visual elements Abstract art Hue Overlapping Saturation Realistic/Realism art Analogous colors Atmospheric perspective Complementary colors Visual elements Design principles Form/Content/ Style Volume Primary colors Local color Mass Shade Tint Kinetic art Texture Types of line (implied, contour, outline, spontaneous, gestural, psychological, actual) Function of line (create depth and texture,...

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History of Americ Ww2

...purchase goods hence supply overpassed demand. The risky dependence on luxury spending and investment of the rich led to market speculation (Judith1996). The same misdistribution of wealth experience by the socioeconomic classes was also experienced among industries in a similar manner. For instance, while there was a booming business in the automotive industry, there was declining productivity in the agriculture industry (Mark 1992). A last major instability and weakness of the American economy was due to the extensive international wealth distribution problems (Frank 1986 & Geoffrey 1982). While the U.S was prospering in the 1920's, the European nations were trying to rebuild themselves after the destruction of the war (Mark 1992). Ww2 had devastated European business as farms; homes and factories were destroyed (Roberts 1984). While the U.S provided the world with banking, food production and manufacturing and busy controlling the world economy, the other countries were getting poorer and couldn’t buy these U.S goods or pay the loans that the America had offered them (Frank 1986). The result was that the international economy became weak that became a great contributor to the great depression (John 1960). Throughout the decade of 190 to 1929, there was mass speculation that flocked the stock market (Mark 1992). The high profit that the speculation created was irresistible to investors (Frank 1986). Company incomes became of little interest to investors; as long......

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Study

...Q: What is the definition of "study habits"? A: The definition of study habits is the habitual practices one uses to help them study and learn. Good study habits can help students achieve and/or maintain good grades. Q: How do you study better? A: Effective studying requires thinking positively, studying in a quiet area, rewriting notes, playing memory games and remaining healthy. Students also need to take breaks and reward themselves periodically. To think in a positive manner, students must think about their talents and skills. Negative and defeatist attitudes must be dispelled from the mind. Students also need to avoid comparing their achievements and successes with other people. Getting away from distractions is imperative. For instance, using a computer when taking notes can lead to playing games or surfing the Internet. Using a notebook instead of a computer helps a person focus better. However, listening to a favorite song on an iPod can motivate students to study better. Libraries and quiet off-campus spots are suitable places to learn. Eating a healthy diet is important because the vitamins and nutrients ensure maximum energy when studying. Certain herbs, such as ginko and ginseng, may enhance memorization skills. Exercise and healthy eating are effective aids when studying. Studying for an hour and taking a five-minute break fosters a more productive study session. Breaking chapters into sections avoids studying for long periods. Rewards can come in......

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The Empire of Japan During Ww2

...The Empire of Japan during WW2 The Empire of Japan during World War two seen great victories and expanding territories it also seen dramatic defeat. “At the height of its power in 1942, the Empire of Japan ruled over a land area spanning 2,857,000 square miles, making it one of the largest maritime empires in history (Colin, 1998).” It was the first and only nation to endure the atomic bomb twice. During this paper we will look at the rise and fall of the Japanese Empire. What kind of Government ran this nation? Was their economy a strong or weak economy at the start of the war and how did the war affect it? How did their military operate? The Empire of Japan’s government was a parliamentary constitutional monarchy. To better understand the dynamics of the Government during WW2 you have to travel back to the Meiji Restoration in 1868. “The Meiji Restoration was the political revolution that brought about the fall of the Tokugawa Shogunate (a feudal military government which existed between 1603 and 1868) and returned control of the country to direct imperial rule under the emperor Meiji (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).” Although, at the start of the Second World War the emperor did not have complete control of the government. The Emperor was the supreme ruler and head of state but the prime minister was the actual head of government. The Emperor was worshipped like a god similar to the Pharos of Egypt during ancient times. “Emperor Hirohito was the emperor......

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Study

...It is possible for students to achieve success in the examination if the correct strategies and study skills are used. Studying effectively does not depend so much on how long one spends with book and notes but how effectively one has been studying. One of the most important recipes for success in examination is to study regularly and consistently. After all ‘Rome was not built in a day’. It is necessary, therefore to draw up a timetable with time set aside for recreation, exercise or television. Equally important is the discipline to stick to the period timetable. Without a study plan or timetable, some subject me be inadequate focus and attention. Another factor that is crucial for examination success is the need to do homework and assignments. Homework and assignments reinforce learning and helps students to identify what they do not know so that remedial work can be done immediately. In addition, homework helps students to practice and reinforce classroom learning. Preparing mind maps is another study skills that can be used to make learning more effective and more meaningful. For subject with a lot of content matter such as History and Biology, mind maps are essential for various reasons. For one, mind maps helps students to focus on the important elements as well as to see relationship between the element more clearly. Next, mind maps are useful tools for revision because the mind can see and remember more easily if ideas and concepts are presented in pictures and......

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History Ww2

...help to soften many of the hardships of unemployment. I’m glad I haven’t got a son. It must be a heartbreaking business to watch your boy grow into manhood and then see him deteriorate because there is no work for him to do. I’ve been out of work now for eight years and I’ve only managed to get eleven days work down the pit in all that time. Work used to shape my whole life, and now I’ve got to face the fact that this will not be so any more. ------------------------------------------------- [John Evans, a 47 year old out of work coal miner from the Rhondda in South Wales, interviewed for a government survey into the effects of unemployment (1935)] SOURCE B4 [From a government enquiry into living standards for the unemployed. This case study is from the town of Blaina in Monmouthshire in 1937.] SOURCE B5 [A cartoon drawn by Sidney Strube and published in the Daily Express newspaper in November 1932. The cartoon was titled Thinking Aloud.] SOURCE B6 ------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- Once I was back living in Wales I could see much more clearly the humiliating and terrible effect of unemployment on people, particularly in the coal mining valleys where all hope seemed to be gone. Men were standing on street corners, not knowing what to do with themselves. People were really hungry. You had to take part in any activity, like the hunger march, which would make people themselves feel that they were fighting......

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Role of Women in Ww2

...Role of Women in WW2 The role of women changed dramatically during and after World War 2 (WW2). Initially women would do the housework and look after the children. During the war, women did not only have to take care of the house, they slowly started becoming popular in the working industry. After the war, women were able to have more power and were considered more than just a pretty face. Topic sentence: Before the war, women had very little freedom, power and job opportunities. Explanation: Women were the leaders of the house. They would cook, clean, wash and wipe whilst looking after children. Some of them had feminine jobs, like tailoring, where they would work and try to earn money in order to support their husbands or if their husbands were unable to work. Before the war, it was generally thought that a MAN was the main bread winner and provider for their families. Ladies were very limited with their social interactions as well. They were occasional allowed get-togethers along-side their husbands. Evidence: Women were devoted to their husbands and if you weren’t married then you were supposed to be devoted to their father. Meaning that you were born to cook, clean, wash, wipe and bear children. Link: But with so many men away at war, this idealistic view began to change. Women were allowed to work and were expected to be an active member of the workforce. Topic sentence: The rise of women and their path to change during WW2. Explanation: When all the men where......

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What Was the Short-Term Significance of Ww2 on Indian Independence ?

...economic situation as well as the pressure from the USA. Furthermore the uprise of the Indian National army and the Quit India movement also had short term significance. At the outbreak of World War II, the Indian League voted for neutrality. When India came under Japanese attack, the Congress ordered for a democratic government in return for their cooperation in the second world war. The left wing of congress refused to support Britain during ww2 and staged a congress revolt while Bose raised the Indian National Army in order to gain Indian independence by supporting the Axis powers. This however weekended the position of the congress. The muslim league stayed loyal to the British. WW2 acted as a catalyst in the Muslim-Hindu divide.The League became increasingly powerful with a membership of over 2 million people.During The second world war it became know that independence could only be achieved if accompanied by a partition. “The Second World War had a profound influence on the British policy towards India.”India's problems during WW2 could not be described as inter-communal but rather international , the outbreak of the second world war highlighted India's problems to Britain. The differences between Hindus and the Muslims were so great that their union under one central government was full of risk “Hindus and the Muslims belong to two different religions,…they belong to two different civilisations that are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions.” In this......

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Study

...Foreign Literature According to Pogue (2000), what is true about study habits was that more than thirty years ago still rings true today-students fail because they do not know how to study. The best advice he can give is to develop sound study skills. It’s a common scene if some college students fail to finish a passing requirement for a subject course. What is lacking is their ignorance of developing good study habits that are necessary for good academic performance. And to worsen their ignorance are their psychological conception of giving up so easily and the tempting distractions of the surrounding that lead them to a zero percent possibility of creating their own ideal habits. So, it has become a major trouble to college students who are known to be suffocated with loads of works from school. To elaborate more about sound study habits, Rothkopf (1982) referred to it as to whether students study at the same time each day, whether they shut off radio, television while reading and whether they paraphrase and write down what they have read during the practical instructions. Study habit also describes some external activities which serve to activate and facilitate the internal process of learning. Study habit is the daily routine of students with regards to their academic duties and responsibilities. Each student has his own study habits varying on his preferences with the place and time of studying, techniques in studying and more. It will depend upon the person if he...

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Post Ww2 Aircraft Manufacturing Problems

...Aviation Manufacturing Challenges Post World War II Jason Weber Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Aviation Manufacturing Challenges Post World War II I. Summary The American aviation industry was in an uncertain era post World War II (WW2). Aircraft manufacturers were suffering large loses as the demand for planes dropped sharply and the market was flooded. This created more supply than demand. Manufactures expected government sales to decline and braced for it. They hinged their hopes on the need for commercial aviation transportation which never came to fruition (Bright, 1978). The resurgence for the industry came in the form of the jet engine. The Navy, being conservative and resistant to change, did not see the need for the jet engine. Unlike the Air Force, the Navy had not encountered jet engine aircraft in combat yet. The Air Force in pursuit of superior air power and national security, was the greatest catalysts in aircraft advancements post WW2 (Converse, 2012). As advancements in the jet engine evolved, aircraft were flying faster and further. The need for stronger structural parts meant the need for new manufacturing techniques (Bright, 1978). II. Problem The problem is that airframe manufacturing was lagging behind the needs set forth by the evolving jet engine. The industry used hand crafting techniques that according to Bright (1978), “In the all-metal piston-engine era, the aircraft industry called itself the "tin benders" (Production: The......

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